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Courses and Schedule

Course
Date
Level
Location
Speaker
  • The Silver Lining
    Sunday, October 24
    8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
    S100BC; Grand Ballroom
    Kommah McDowell
    Elekta

    The speaker will share tips for providing optimal care to radiation therapy patients gleaned from her own journey through radiation therapy treatment. The course will cover tactics for communicating with patients, including understanding how patients receive information and how to explain information from their perspective. It also will cover the importance of encouraging patients to use their voices during the treatment process as well as tips for therapists on how to hear and act on those voices. Finally, the speaker will discuss the importance of going the extra mile with patients, regardless of their prognoses, because there is always hope.

    Kommah McDowell, M.S.L.M.

    • Speaking patients’ language.
    • Hearing patients’ voices.
    • Advocating for patients.
    • Looking beyond the horizon.
    • Finding the silver lining.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Incivility in the Workplace: Its Impact on People, Practice and Beyond
    Sunday, October 24
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    S100BC; Grand Ballroom
    Charles Washington
    Elekta

    Incivility among radiation oncology practitioners is becoming more prevalent, affecting performance, mental health and retention. In addition, tolerance of incivility perpetuates continued behavior and a continued cycle of inappropriate actions. This course will explore the reasons incivility exists, its signs and symptoms in the workplace and how to recognize the behavior. It also will explore reflections on the relevance of incivility in radiation oncology practice and strategic and tactical tools to address it.

    Charles Washington, Ed.D., R.T.(T), FASRT

    • Articulate the importance of understanding incivility and how it manifests in radiation oncology practice.
    • Recognize the signs of incivility and its impact on practice.
    • Explore methods of addressing incivility and associated behaviors.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Teaming in the Radiation Oncology Environment
    Sunday, October 24
    10:45 a.m.-11:45 a.m.
    S100BC; Grand Ballroom
    Linnae Campbell
    Elekta

    Teaming is an action carried out by radiation oncology departments. In Amy Edmondson’s book, Teaming, there are many concepts that can be applied to radiation oncology. When applied, the concepts help individuals team successfully regardless of the individuals’ roles in the department. During the session, the concept of teaming will be explored with a focus on radiation oncology examples. Furthermore, there will be a discussion on psychological safety in order to team and learn. Next, the types of boundaries that can make teaming more challenging will be identified along with ways to work across them. Finally, the talk will discuss how to approach failure when it inevitably occurs.

    Linnae Campbell, M.S., M.S.H.A., R.T.(R)(T), CMD

    • Apply the concept of teaming to the radiation oncology environment.
    • Understand workplace psychological safety and how to foster it in the workplace.
    • Identify the types of boundaries that can inhibit teaming and how to work across boundaries.
    • Understand how to approach failure and learn from failure when it happens.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • New Opportunities and Pathways for Advanced Practice Radiation Therapy Roles
    Sunday, October 24
    12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m.
    S100BC; Grand Ballroom
    Samantha Skubish Clodagh Starrs
    Elekta

    The evolution of radiation therapy practice in the United States is inevitable. The scope of a radiation therapist’s role has progressed with advancing technology and implementation of special procedures and patient care requirements. Internationally, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom have formalized this evolution through the advanced practice radiation therapist role. The role provides new models of care to meet growing demands in the practice of radiation oncology, increases efficiency, decreases costs and retains skilled staff. The APRT role has proven beneficial in many ways, including improving patient care within much needed patient cohorts such as the palliative population. The U.S. is no exception to requiring innovative care models and solutions. The U.S. is experiencing an increase in demand for cancer services and a rapid rate of technological and treatment advancements under mounting financial pressures. This situation has affected the daily tasks of physicians, increasing workload, increasing the complexity of clinical decision-making and pushing the scope of radiation therapists toward maximization. The speakers will discuss professional development opportunities, potential pathways to role expansion, current needs, and the value of expanding the scope of radiation therapists practicing in the U.S.

    Samantha Skubish, M.S., R.T.(R)(T)

    Clodagh Starrs, R.T.(T), PgC

    • Review the history of the radiation therapy profession and the evolution of practice in the U.S.
    • Understand the current scope of practice and the drivers behind maximization.
    • Explore international models of practice and alternative models of care.
    • Review potential barriers and benefits of expanding the clinical role of the radiation therapist.
    • Understand future directions and interest.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C

  • Cardiac Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Therapist’s Perspective
    Monday, October 25
    8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
    102 A-D
    Kylee Warnecke Michaela Boyd
    Accuray

    This course offers an overview of stereotactic body radiation therapy for treating ventricular tachycardia. It will provide background information on VT and modalities used to treat the condition, introduce clinical research that shows radiation therapy to be a viable treatment option for this condition, and present protocols and lessons learned related to treating VT with SBRT. Attendees will learn about appropriate patient selection, computed tomography simulation procedures, motion management considerations and treatment planning guidelines. In addition, the speakers will share their experience with implementing cardiac SBRT into stereotactic treatment workflows and will highlight key needs, workflows to be developed and the challenges that arise when implementing such a program.

    Kylee Warnecke, B.S., R.T.(T)

    Michaela Boyd, B.S., R.T.(T)

    • Discuss the considerations and challenges of using stereotactic body radiation therapy for treating ventricular tachycardia.
    • Review computed tomography simulation procedures, motion management strategies, treatment planning considerations and treatment workflow.
    • Understand what ventricular tachycardia is and the role of radiation therapy as a noninvasive treatment option for advanced ventricular tachycardia.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Lessons From a Single Linear Accelerator Halcyon Center
    Monday, October 25
    8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
    103 A-D
    Evan Meekins
    Varian

    This course offers an overview of the unique challenges of developing and running a radiation therapy program using only the Varian Halcyon linear accelerator. The speakers will review the strengths and weaknesses of the Halcyon as well as the limitations that are unique to treatment planning and delivery using a ring gantry single-energy accelerator. Finally, they will discuss the challenges that occur with some of the more common treatments as well as the techniques and rationale they use to overcome these challenges.

    Evan Meekins, M.S

    • Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the Halcyon.
    • Understand the limitations of using conventional planning techniques on a nonconventional platform.
    • Learn new methods of treatment planning for sites otherwise conventionally planned with a high-energy C-arm accelerator.
    • Discuss the efficacy of incorporating a Halcyon into a radiation therapy program.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Leading in Reality: Supporting Your Team Through Trust and Accountability
    Monday, October 25
    8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
    105 A-D
    Stephanie Bailey
     

    This course offers an overview of reality-based leadership and how it can improve efficiency and accountability and reduce emotional waste. Having highly accountable staff can improve the experience for the patient and the productivity of the department. The course will describe the factors of accountability and ways to develop accountability in staff and co-workers. The content is valuable for all employees, whether in a leadership role or not.

    Stephanie Bailey, B.S., R.T.(R)(T)

    • Identify types of leadership and why reality-based leadership promotes accountability and efficiency.
    • Identify emotional waste and how to reduce it.
    • Learn tools to change or enhance a person’s leadership style.
    • Understand factors of accountability and ways to develop them.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Teaching Emotional Intelligence in the Classroom
    Monday, October 25
    8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
    106 A-B
    Kim Mylan
     

    A kind and empathetic bedside manner is an essential trait in a radiation therapist. However, while most curricula focus on the technical aspects of the field, instruction in improving emotional intelligence often is lacking. This course will explore ways to efficiently and effectively incorporate emotional intelligence teaching into radiation therapy curricula. Attendees will be presented with areas of need for further research in emotional intelligence education and be given tools to improve empathy learning in the future.

    Kim Mylan, M.B.A., R.T.(T)

    • Define and distinguish between the types of intelligences.
    • Understand research on teaching emotional intelligence in health care programs.
    • Identify opportunities to teach emotional intelligence within the curriculum.
    • Learn tools to improve students’ emotional intelligence.
    • Identify areas of need for research on emotional intelligence in radiation therapy.
    • Recommend curriculum changes for future success.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Importance of Team Cohesion and Mentorship in Radiation Therapy
    Monday, October 25
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    102 A-D
    Beeban Natt
    Accuray

    This course showcases methods participants can use to build a team and collaborate with peers (both on- and offsite) as a radiation therapist. This course will also delve into the importance of having a mentor both as a new graduate and as a seasoned radiation therapist. The speaker will present the benefits and challenges of teamwork and finding the natural fit in a team as an experienced radiation therapist at a large cancer center.

    Beeban Natt, B.S. R.T.(T)

    • Understand the nuances of working as a therapist both on- and offsite.
    • Learn about a HIPAA-compliant process used to communicate with all staff while working to develop and nurture staff relationships and foster team cohesion.
    • Identify how to find a mentor in radiation therapy.
    • Discuss future directions of teamwork.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Varian Hour
    Clinical Implementation of IDENTIFY as a Supporting Role in the Patient Journey Through Radiation Treatment
    Monday, October 25
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    103 A-D
    Camera Shy
    Varian

    The speaker will share the CARTI experience implementing the IDENTIFY system. Incorporated within the Varian technology portfolio, IDENTIFY is a comprehensive system for patient identification, safety and motion tracking during treatment delivery.

    Leslie Spears, R.T.(T)

    • Discuss radiation therapy safety challenges and how IDENTIFY can play a role in overcoming them.
    • Describe how IDENTIFY may increase workflow efficiencies in a radiation therapy clinic.
    • Explain how IDENTIFY provides a guided patient experience from simulation to treatment delivery.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D

  • Qfix Presents
    Improving Patient Setup Accuracy for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy Treatments With Advanced Immobilization System
    Monday, October 25
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    104 A-B
    Julie Maday Megan Brotherton Nicole Ottaviani
    Qfix Logo

    This course provides an overview and demonstration of how new products and practices in the treatment of head and neck cancers are improving the outcome for the patient as well as patient experience. It also will explore techniques for molding cushions and making thermoplastic masks with dry heat for patient positioning. Participants will learn how effective head and neck treatments can be accomplished through immobilization techniques in conjunction with advanced technologies such as onboard imaging and surface-guided monitoring systems. The speakers will demonstrate simulation and treatment setups using these cutting-edge devices and systems.

    Julie Maday, B.S., R.T.(R)(T)

    Megan Brotherton, B.S., R.T.(T)

    Nicole Ottaviani, B.S., R.T.(T)

    • Apply hands-on experience making superior masks using built-in shim system, with fewer resimulations.
    • Apply useful techniques for molding cushions for head and neck support.
    • Discuss how ovens are used for thermoplastic preparation and identify workflow adjustment when switching to dry heat.
    • Benefits of open face masks for patient experience, including reproducible daily setups using SGRT.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D

  • Improving Respiratory Gating Workflow Within a Multidisciplinary Team
    Monday, October 25
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    105 A-D
    Cynthia Vavasis Kevin Minassian
     

    Innovative techniques for reducing internal anatomical breathing motion during abdominal radiation therapy help provide patients with better care and overall treatment success. Because these new techniques involve implementing clinical protocols, troubleshooting and workflow changes must also occur. For the multidisciplinary team, this protocol can feel overwhelming. However, tailoring each step in the patient process to suit department-specific needs, while providing the patient with better outcomes, benefits all. Continuous improvement of the patient’s experience and overall treatment effectiveness is the role of radiation therapists. This course will review the process improvement plan used for respiratory-gated patients at Mount Sinai Hospital. It also will review the factors that play a role in a seamless workflow simulation and treatment processes, including workflow aids such as breathing cues, continuously triggered KV imaging and the nuances in patient education. In addition, it will outline the basic concepts of respiratory gating and how it compares to other motion management techniques.

    Cynthia Vavasis, A.A.S, R.T.(T)

    Kevin Minassian, B.S., R.T.(T)

    • Understand the theory, principles and evolution of respiratory gating.
    • Compare respiratory gating techniques to other forms of motion management (e.g., breath hold, compression).
    • Discuss key concepts of workflow improvement.
    • Review each step in the patient process and learn from the experience of the academic hospital that implemented process improvement techniques.
    • Understand various imaging techniques and available technology and their use with respiratory gating patients.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Examining Certification Exam Pass Rates in Radiation Therapy: Does Degree Level Make a Difference?
    Monday, October 25
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    106 A-B
    LeShell PalmerJones
     

    The information to be presented is the result of a retrospective and quantitative correlational study that examined the effect of degree level on certification exam pass rates in radiation therapy education programs.

    LeShell Palmer Jones, D.H.Sc., R.T.(T), CMD

    • Recognize the differences in certification exam pass rates among degree levels.
    • Identify the factors examined and their contribution to the statistical significance of radiation therapy certification exam pass rates.
    • Identify the statistical tests used to formulate the data for this study.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Alternative Approach to Treating Left Breast Patient
    Monday, October 25
    10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
    102 A-D
    Renee Gutierrez
    Accuray

    This course provides information on how to set up a patient for left breast treatment when the facility doesn’t have equipment for left breast treatment. The speaker will offer a step-by-step — from simulation to treatment room — explanation of how to roll a patient onto their side without treating the heart in the field and in a way that will ensure setup reproducibility. Current left breast treatment with new technology also will be discussed.

    Renee Gutierrez, B.A., R.T.(T)

    • Describe how to perform a simulation of a left breast rolled technique.
    • Recognize the importance of following steps in the simulation to ensure a reproducible setup.
    • Identify the benefits of finding an alternate technique when new software isn’t available.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C

  • Quality Management in Radiation Therapy Simplified
    Monday, October 25
    10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
    103 A-D
    Mohammad Bakhtiari
    Varian

    The health care system is moving from a volume-based practice to a value-based one; therefore, quality improvement should be a part of the daily work of frontline workers. This shift requires a cohesive approach tailored to the inherent complexity of modern radiation oncology workflows. This course offers instruction on simplifying the quality management and quality improvement concepts for frontline health care providers and describes the interconnectivity among the various parts of the quality improvement and quality management system, enabling health care providers to act on the components in a meaningful way and with a clear purpose.

    Mohammad Bakhtiari, Ph.D., DABR

    • Identify the components of quality management in radiation therapy and understand the relationship among the components.
    • Describe the importance of incident reporting and how to increase reporting through psychological safety.
    • Understand incident learning and cognitive diversity.
    • Recognize how process improvement is related to other parts of quality management, such as mortality and morbidity, huddle, incident learning, peer review and chart checks.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C

  • Qfix Presents
    Improving Patient Setup Accuracy for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy Treatments With Advanced Immobilization System
    Monday, October 25
    10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
    104 A-B
    Qfix Logo

    This course provides an overview and demonstration of how new products and practices in the treatment of head and neck cancers are improving the outcome for the patient as well as patient experience. It also will explore techniques for molding cushions and making thermoplastic masks with dry heat for patient positioning. Participants will learn how effective head and neck treatments can be accomplished through immobilization techniques in conjunction with advanced technologies such as onboard imaging and surface-guided monitoring systems. The speakers will demonstrate simulation and treatment setups using these cutting-edge devices and systems.

    Julie Maday, B.S., R.T.(R)(T)

    Megan Brotherton, B.S., R.T.(T)

    Nicole Ottaviani, B.S., R.T.(T)

    • Apply hands-on experience making superior masks using built-in shim system, with fewer resimulations.
    • Apply useful techniques for molding cushions for head and neck support.
    • Discuss how ovens are used for thermoplastic preparation and identify workflow adjustment when switching to dry heat.
    • Benefits of open face masks for patient experience, including reproducible daily setups using SGRT.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D

  • What Can I Do With a Degree in Radiation Therapy?
    Monday, October 25
    10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
    105 A-D
    John Klade
     

    Many people believe a degree in radiation therapy limits them to one or two career choices. In actuality, there are many pathways a radiation therapist can take after receiving their degree. This course will explore avenues available to radiation therapists by presenting information gathered from interviews with radiation therapists in various specialties. It also will show the many ways radiation can be delivered as well as opportunities the degree can provide, from clinic administration to application training to legislative work. Finally, the course aims to show students and new graduates the possibilities available to them and inspire seasoned radiation therapists to find more purpose in their careers.

    John Klade, B.S., R.T.(T)

    • Understand current requirements to receive a degree in radiation therapy.
    • List specialties regarding radiation therapy treatment delivery.
    • Describe the benefits and challenges of working in the vendor sector.
    • Identify opportunities for advancement within a radiation oncology setting.
    • Learn how to become involved in legislative work.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Preparing Preceptors: Clinical Coaching Strategies for Radiation Therapists
    Monday, October 25
    10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
    106 A-B
    Maria Dimopoulos
     

    The clinical learning environment is central to radiation therapy education. Licensed radiation therapists are an essential link between didactic education and clinical practice and are vital to the growth of the radiation therapy profession. Radiation therapy students identify preceptors as key to their learning in the clinical setting; however, radiation therapists often feel unprepared to serve in this role. Given the clinical advancements over the past 10 years, novice preceptors need training and support to learn transformative approaches to clinical teaching, and experienced radiation therapists may desire to use more innovative methods. Building on modern teaching principles, this course will explore the role of radiation therapists as clinical preceptors through the perspective of radiation therapy students and staff, and the speaker will highlight recommendations and clinical coaching strategies. Radiation therapists will learn how to apply effective communication to set expectations, provide constructive feedback, elicit critical thinking and evaluate student performance.

    Maria Dimopoulos, M.B.A., R.T.(T)

    • Classify various education models.
    • Conceptualize different approaches to student learning.
    • Acquire clinical teaching strategies.
    • Formulate questions that elicit critical thinking.
    • Assess student clinical competence and communicate feedback.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Pediatric Positioning
    Monday, October 25
    1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
    102 A-D
    Andrew Saunders
    Accuray

    Radiation oncology has played an important role in cancer treatment at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital since its founding in 1962. Treating children presents a unique set of challenges. Aided by multiple imaging modalities, the facility fabricated, assessed and optimized its immobilization devices. The immobilization industry is primarily adult–care- focused, requiring customization of devices that can span infant to young adult setup requirements. In early 2020, St. Jude’s initiated a protocol called SJPROTON2 that is designed to evaluate setup uncertainty in children receiving proton therapy. This course will introduce the protocol, define the therapist’s role in it, discuss initial data and present a model for developing an evidence-based practice for immobilization selection and image guidance.

    Andrew Saunders, B.S.R.S., R.T.(R)(T)

    • Recall common pediatric cancers and discuss contemporary radiation therapy techniques.
    • Navigate the issues faced when working with anesthetized patients.
    • Choose appropriate immobilization for a variety of common pediatric sites.
    • Understand the strengths and weaknesses of planar and volumetric image-guided radiation therapy.
    • Appreciate the intricacies of database design and protocol implementation.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C

  • Improving CT Simulation Workflow in Radiation Therapy
    Monday, October 25
    1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
    103 A-D
    Jesenia Dutan
    Varian

    This course will present a scheduling method that will help improve delays during the simulation appointment and will focus on specific roles and tasks necessary to implement an efficient and systematic workflow. Attendees will be able to track the main causes of delays for the simulation appointments in order to make changes to increase timeliness of appointments in radiation oncology departments.

    Jesenia Dutan, B.A., R.T.(T)

    • Use the schedule to be proactively prepared.
    • Identify the tasks that are to be completed before a patient enters the computed tomography suite.
    • Recognize the factors that lead to delays in starting the simulation session.
    • Define who is responsible for each task.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C

  • Qfix Presents
    Prone Breast: Understanding the Advantages and Challenges
    Monday, October 25
    1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
    104 A-B
    Jason Ye Marissa Timoteo
    Qfix Logo

    Radiation treatment of the breasts in the prone position may be the future for breast cancer treatments. However, it has not been widely adopted, possibly because of the set-up challenges it presents. This course will review the workflow and quality assurance of the prone breast technique from simulation to treatment and share methods to overcome the technique’s potential challenges.

    Jason C. Ye, M.D.

    Marissa Timoteo, M.B.A., R.T.(T)

    • Understand the practical advantages of treating breasts prone vs. supine.
    • Distinguish which patients would benefit in prone vs. supine treatment.
    • Identify the various challenges in prone simulations and solutions for improved setup and treatment accuracy.
    • Troubleshoot problems and issues that may occur in daily prone setup.
    • Discuss the future of prone breast treatment in radiation oncology.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Artificial Intelligence in Radiation Therapy
    Monday, October 25
    1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
    105 A-D
    Kim Rans
     

    The use of artificial intelligence in radiation therapy is growing steadily as computing power and algorithms get faster and more accurate. This course will discuss the benefits and challenges of AI software performing target volume and organ at risk contouring as well as optimizing dose volume histograms. Attendees will be provided with cutting-edge information using AI software for magnetic resonance-linear accelerators and biology-guided radiation therapy and how it benefits oncology patients. In addition, the speaker will present research from leading cancer institutions, industry vendors and scholarly articles.

    Kim Rans, MAIS, B.A., MRT(T), CMD

    • Recognize the benefits and challenges of using artificial intelligence software in the treatment planning process.
    • Differentiate how AI software may provide savings on cost, decreasing time and increasing quality of contouring organs at risk and target volumes.
    • Discuss the effect of AI software for oncology patients using newer technologies such as MR-linacs and BgRT.
    • Describe how AI software through vendor competition is spurring the development of fully automated tools in medical dosimetry.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Patient Safety Transformation – A Study
    Monday, October 25
    1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
    106 A-B
    Becky Dodge
     

    Technological advancements have increased the complexity of radiation therapy treatment, revealing the need for new ways to think about patient safety, inclusive of qualitative elements. To transform current patient safety knowledge, long-standing and uncritically acquired assumptions must be evaluated. A qualitative research design was used to explore how radiation therapy programs foster transformational learning concerning patient safety. Results from this study will be shared in the course, revealing opportunities for faculty and clinical mentors to prepare future radiation therapists to manage complex and novel safety issues.

    Becky Dodge, Ph.D., R.T.(R)(T)

    • Discuss the problem of preventable medical errors in the context of radiation therapy.
    • Compare traditional (quantitative) and modern (qualitative) concepts of patient safety.
    • Define transformational learning.
    • Recognize central precursor components of transformational learning.
    • Identify possible next steps to foster more inclusive, discerning and permeable perspectives of patient safety.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C

  • Accuray Hour
    Elongated Treatment Fields: Complex or Simple?
    Monday, October 25
    2:15 p.m.-3:15 p.m.
    102 A-D
    Awais Mirza
    Accuray

    This course will cover the historical challenges that radiation therapist have experienced when treating complex indications that require extended distance setups or elongated treatment fields. The speaker will review treatment setups that are based on clinical indications (e.g., total body irradiation, cranio-spinal irradiation, oligometastatic disease) to distinguish the differences in patient positioning and setup parameters.

    Awais Mirza, R.T.(T)

    • Understand the clinical indications that require elongated treatment fields.
    • Identify setup methods to treat elongated fields.
    • Explain how institutions are treating elongated fields.
    • Recognize differences in planning techniques.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D

  • Image-guided Total Body Irradiation and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: The NYU Langone Technique
    Monday, October 25
    2:15 p.m.-3:15 p.m.
    103 A-D
    Maria Baybay Ruth Afanador
    Varian

    Total body irradiation combined with chemotherapy has been part of the conditioning regimens for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell or bone marrow transplant for decades. As emerging technologies and protocols have developed, volumetric modulated arc therapy has been explored to deliver TBI while limiting lung mean dose and other organs at risk. This course will discuss the clinical implementation of a VMAT-based TBI protocol from simulation to treatment delivery, including practice insights gleaned from development and subsequent application.

    Maria Baybay, R.T.(T)

    Ruth Afanador, M.B.A., R.T.(T)(CT)

    • Compare conventional 3D TBI treatment and TBI VMAT technique.
    • Discuss the importance of patient positioning and the use of custom devices.
    • Describe the treatment delivery workflow including an internally developed couch calculator program.
    • Recognize how practical experience improves treatment efficiency, accuracy and delivery.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Qfix Presents
    Prone Breast: Understanding the Advantages and Challenges
    Monday, October 25
    2:15 p.m.-3:15 p.m.
    104 A-B
    Jason Ye Marissa Timoteo
    Qfix Logo

    Radiation treatment of the breasts in the prone position may be the future for breast cancer treatments. However, it has not been widely adopted, possibly because of the set-up challenges it presents. This course will review the workflow and quality assurance of the prone breast technique from simulation to treatment and share methods to overcome the technique’s potential challenges.

    Jason C. Ye, M.D.

    Marissa Timoteo, M.B.A., R.T.(T)

    • Understand the practical advantages of treating breasts prone vs. supine.
    • Distinguish which patients would benefit in prone vs. supine treatment.
    • Identify the various challenges in prone simulations and solutions for improved setup and treatment accuracy.
    • Troubleshoot problems and issues that may occur in daily prone setup.
    • Discuss the future of prone breast treatment in radiation oncology.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Tracking and Identifying Trends of Quality Assurance Incidents in Radiation Oncology
    Monday, October 25
    2:15 p.m.-3:15 p.m.
    105 A-D
    Christina Holowinski Veronica Grimaldi
     

    This course will inform the attendees of the benefits of establishing a robust and comprehensive quality assurance incident reporting and tracking program. The speakers will review the quality assurance tracking program used at their institution and highlight its functionality and capabilities. Attendees will gain knowledge of recommended workflows to improve patient safety by implementing policy changes and enhanced training. Speakers also will share data by reviewing events that demonstrate how collaborative staff involvement can lead to process improvements.

    Christina Holowinski, B.A., R.T.(R)(T)

    Veronica Grimaldi, M.S., R.T.(T)

    • Recognize the importance of hospital-wide quality assurance reporting and tracking.
    • Educate participants on available programs designed for event reporting.
    • Learn how to query keywords to track trends.
    • Discuss events that lead to process changes and policy updates.
    • Present case examples of near misses and good catches.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Patient Education in Radiation Oncology: A Survey Study
    Monday, October 25
    2:15 p.m.-3:15 p.m.
    106 A-B
    Kristi Tonning
     

    In 2020, about half of the approximately 1.8 million people diagnosed with cancer received radiation therapy during their treatment course. The literature suggests that that most of them have very little knowledge about radiation therapy and what to expect, and this lack of knowledge can create anxiety. Targeted patient education can reduce anxiety; however, patient education in radiation oncology departments often is not standardized and does not always meet patients’ needs. Because patients interact with and receive education or information from multiple team members throughout the planning and treatment process, communication and teamwork are essential for patient support. The speaker will share data from a longitudinal survey study that focused on anxiety and knowledge in patients undergoing radiation therapy, patient education and the interprofessional team.

    Kristi Linnea Tonning, Ph.D., M.Sc., B.S.R.T., R.T.(T)

    • Recognize areas where patient anxiety related to radiation therapy is present.
    • Recognize differing roles of radiation therapists internationally and explore opportunities for growth in the U.S.
    • Describe the impact of individual interprofessional team members on patient education.
    • Identify patient knowledge gaps related to radiation therapy treatment.
    • Discuss the role of the radiation therapist in patient education.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Workplace Threats – Are You Prepared?
    Monday, October 25
    3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
    102 A-D
    Zachary Smith
    Accuray

    Violence in the workplace is a constant threat. This speaker will review several health care-related scenarios including experiences with shooting events in his facility. This course will challenge the participant to consider the very real possibility of a violent altercation occurring at their workplace and steps to reduce the chance of an occurrence and reduce the loss of life. The speaker will discuss recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security, FBI, and FEMA for ensuring a secure workplace before and during a violent event.

    Zachary Smith, M.B.A., R.T.(R)(T)

    • Understand common threats that exist for health care facilities.
    • Be able to identify potential risks.
    • Describe measures for improving workplace security.
    • Determine the actions to take in response to a security situation.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Breast Radiation Therapy: Imaging and Setup Issues
    Monday, October 25
    3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
    103 A-D
    Pamela Cabrera
    Varian

    This course will discuss various imaging and matching issues that are encountered repeatedly while treating left and right breasts. Not every situation or setup is a textbook case. Often, a perfect KV match with an antero-posterior and lateral posterior turns out to be a less than perfect tangent field when the actual treatment field MV is taken. Or, perhaps, tattoos given in computed tomography or on port day prove to be ineffective. How radiation therapists adapt to these situations is what makes them efficient and effective masters of the trade. The speaker will provide data about and suggestions for streamlining the process to reduce a patient’s time on the table and make the department run more efficiently.

    Pamela Cabrera, B.A., R.T.(R)(T)

    • Address issues with imaging protocols for breasts.
    • Analyze data given.
    • Discuss solutions for improved imaging techniques and matching.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Cancer Coaching – The Missing Element in Cancer Care
    Monday, October 25
    3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
    105 A-D
    Sally Eggleston
     

    Cancer coaches strive to help cancer patients and survivors address their emotional and physical well-being. This care is in addition to the radiation treatment patients receive. This course will define cancer coaching, identify the specific elements present in cancer coaching, and describe the differences between cancer coaching, counseling and therapy. The speaker will make an argument for implementing cancer coaching in cancer centers for current and completed patients and share various options for such an implementation process. She also will discuss key tools used during cancer coaching that clinical staff can employ during cancer treatment.

    Sally Eggleston, M.B.A., R.T.(T)

    • Define cancer coaching.
    • Clarify the differences between cancer coaching, counseling and therapy.
    • Explain the hurdles in implementing a cancer coaching program.
    • Present tools that clinical staff can use in lieu of a formalized cancer coaching training.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Path to Publication
    Monday, October 25
    3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
    106 A-B
    Benjamin Morris
     

    Presentations and lectures often contain the seeds of excellent journal articles. However, to be accepted for publication, these works often require additional content and careful revision. On the other hand, a thesis or dissertation typically includes far more information than is appropriate for a journal article and may require narrowing edits or focusing. This course will discuss the various paths to publication, common pitfalls and helpful hints.

    Benjamin Morris, M.S.E.D., R.T.(R)(T)(CT)

    • Understand key concepts associated with publishing in a peer-reviewed journal.
    • Delineate the common types of manuscript submissions to peer-reviewed journals and discuss key elements of each type.
    • Understand common hurdles writers experience on the path to publication and discuss techniques and solutions to overcome those challenges.
    • Discuss various pathways to publication, including converting a lecture, thesis or dissertation into a journal article.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Pre-treatment Imaging Services – What Is it and When Is it Billable?
    Tuesday, October 26
    8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
    103 A-D
    Adam Brown Trena Taylor
     

    This course will define pre-treatment imaging services and provide an overview of what those services are and how they are billed. The information shared will increase participants’ awareness of rules and regulations in the realm of orders, medical necessity and compliance. In addition, the speakers will provide an overview of the differences in each modality, the rules defining a freestanding vs. hospital outpatient facility, and therapists’ responsibilities and expectations regarding imaging.

    Adam Brown, B.S., R.T.(T), CMD

    Trena Taylor, B.A., R.T.(R)(T), CPC

    • Discuss the need for orders and medical necessity regarding imaging.
    • Detail the similarities and differences between specific imaging modalities.
    • Provide an overview of services and rules between freestanding and hospital outpatient settings regarding imaging.
    • Explain the differences between bundling and packaging.
    • Discuss clinical responsibilities and expectations of therapists.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • MacroMedics Presents
    Implementing Innovation: Clinical Feedback for Implementing an All-In-One System
    Tuesday, October 26
    8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
    104 A-B
    Aaron Anderson Deborah Burton
    MacroMedics Logo

    This course will describe the OmniBoard all-in-one system, including the double shell system for SRS, and discuss the workflow when using the system for immobilization and positioning. The speakers will discuss training and the learning curve with the system, treatment planning and quality assurance considerations, and disease sites (e.g., intracranial, lung, breast, abdominal, gastrointestinal, prostate).They also will present trial data related to accuracy, reproducibility and patient comfort.

    Aaron Anderson, M.S., DABR

    Deborah Burton, CMD

    • Describe the history of the system and provide an overview of the double shell positioning system and the OmniBoard clinical data on the implementation of the systems.
    • Discuss disease sites and techniques including SRS, SBRT, head and neck, lung, breast, and prostate data for reproducibility and patient experience.
    • Understand treatment planning and dosimetric considerations.
    • Review a video demonstration of a double shell mask being fabricated.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Improving Patient Communication and Interactions in Radiation Therapy
    Tuesday, October 26
    8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
    105 A-D
    Angela Oliveira
     

    In health care, the concept of caring is prevalent in the visions and mission statements of many institutions and organizations. Patients’ perception of their health care experience is shaped every time they interact with the health care team. Various terms such as patient-centered care, patient engagement and patient experience have been used over the past decade to capture this concept and to champion a more empathetic system. The daily contact between radiation therapists and their patients can have a profound impact on the patient experience and the quality of patient-centered care. It is evident that patients who feel they are receiving quality care from their radiation therapy team often have higher levels of satisfaction, psychological adjustment and compliance with treatment-related recommendations.

    Angela Oliveira, M.P.A., M.H.A., R.T.(T)

    • Examine barriers and strategies for effective communication.
    • Identify opportunities for new initiatives and action plans to improve patient interactions.
    • Discuss how quality health care is built on effective and well-functioning teams.
    • Provide a managerial approach to improving patient and therapist interactions and reviewing strategies for effective communication.
    • Examine how positive patient interactions are strongly related to better treatment outcomes.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Acquiring Observation Experiences With Online Observation Modules
    Tuesday, October 26
    8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
    106 A-B
    Melissa Weege Amanda Carpenter
     

    HIPAA restrictions and now the COVID-19 pandemic have made it challenging for applicants to radiation therapy education programs to obtain job shadowing or observation hours in the field before applying to education programs. It is important for student attrition rates and overall educational satisfaction for applicants to have a good understanding and overview of the radiation therapy profession before being admitted to an education program. Therefore, other methods of exposure to the profession are needed. The radiation therapy program at University of Wisconsin – La Crosse created online observation modules to allow program applicants to gain knowledge of various aspects of radiation therapy. This course will provide radiation therapy program leaders with a template and format to create meaningful observation modules in radiation therapy.

    Melissa Weege, M.S., R.T.(T), CMD

    Amanda Carpenter, M.S., R.T.(T)

    • Understand the importance of providing information about radiation therapy to applicants of an education program.
    • Recognize the barriers to obtaining job shadowing and observation hours.
    • Create meaningful observation modules related to the various areas of radiation therapy practice.
    • Develop reflective activities to engage applicants in applying module knowledge and strong assessment methods for such activities.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • You Can Have It All: How to Meet Patient Treatment Needs
    Tuesday, October 26
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    102 A-D
    Emily Vollink
     

    Radiation oncology has continuously improved patient care, enhanced clinical workflows and paved the way for curing cancer. ExacTrac Dynamic is new technology from Brainlab that uses a combination of x-rays, surface guidance imaging and a thermal surface component to ensure patients are positioned and treated accurately. This course presents an overview of how the technology and its various workflows can maximize efficiency and deliver high-precision treatments.

    Emily Vollink, A.S., R.T.(T), PMP

    • Introduce new ExacTrac Dynamic technology.
    • Discuss surface guidance and why it is important.
    • Differentiate ExacTrac Dynamic from other systems.
    • Cover the different workflows the system provides (e.g., implanted marker, bony fusion, CBCT workflow, DIBH) and future options.
    • Understand consistent treatment at coplanar angles by being able to image the patient.
    • Conclude with all the benefits the system offers.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Adaptive Planning – How to Apply Current Codes to New Technology
    Tuesday, October 26
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    103 A-D
    Adam Brown Teri Bedard
     

    Implementing a new treatment modality or purchasing new equipment can be exciting, but coding for the new procedure can be challenging. In radiation oncology, it is not uncommon for technology to bypass the available CPT codes, which leaves users questioning which codes to use and what will be reimbursed. This course will address the history and requirements of the current dosimetry planning CPT codes, including expected frequency and quantities and required quality assurance and documentation. Examples of emerging adaptive planning techniques will be discussed, including recommendations for applying the most appropriate codes, key documentation requirements and potential payer issues.

    Adam Brown, B.S., R.T.(T), CMD

    Teri Bedard, B.A., R.T.(R)(T), CPC

    • Discuss the history of the current dosimetry planning CPT codes.
    • Review expected frequencies and quantities of the dosimetry planning codes based on historic practice patterns.
    • Understand the quality assurance requirements to be performed as part of the dosimetry planning process.
    • Detail the documentation challenges specific to adaptive planning based on current workflow.
    • Outline current authoritative guidance that creates potential payer issues.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C

  • MacroMedics Presents
    Implementing Innovation: Clinical Feedback for Implementing an All-In-One System
    Tuesday, October 26
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    104 A-B
    Aaron Anderson Deborah Burton
    MacroMedics Logo

    This course will describe the OmniBoard all-in-one system, including the double shell system for SRS, and discuss the workflow when using the system for immobilization and positioning. The speakers will discuss training and the learning curve with the system, treatment planning and quality assurance considerations, and disease sites (e.g., intracranial, lung, breast, abdominal, gastrointestinal, prostate).They also will present trial data related to accuracy, reproducibility and patient comfort.

    Aaron Anderson, M.S., DABR

    Deborah Burton, CMD

    • Describe the history of the system and provide an overview of the double shell positioning system and the OmniBoard clinical data on the implementation of the systems.
    • Discuss disease sites and techniques including SRS, SBRT, head and neck, lung, breast, and prostate data for reproducibility and patient experience.
    • Understand treatment planning and dosimetric considerations.
    • Review a video demonstration of a double shell mask being fabricated.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, C, D, E

  • Creating a Cohesive Clinical Environment Among Generational Differences
    Tuesday, October 26
    9:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m.
    105 A-D
    Cheryl Young
     

    Working in a cohesive clinical environment is essential to providing optimal patient care. Like it or not, the face of the profession is changing. With baby boomers transitioning out of the workforce, Generation X and millennials are left to shape the profession. Understanding the characteristics of each generation and their learning styles can lead to optimal treatment outcomes and to a more satisfying work environment. Also, recognition of generational differences can lead to new ways of complementing one another and creating learning opportunities.

    Cheryl Young, Ed.D., M.S., R.T.(T)

    • Define and understand generational differences.
    • Discuss and compare working styles of different generations.
    • Learn about the learning styles of the generations.
    • Identify the changing trends within the profession and the impact they have on the profession’s population.
    • Learn new ways to acknowledge generational differences and use these differences to learn from one another.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Klarity Presents
    All About Bolus: Techniques for Application, Molding and Skin-sparing
    Tuesday, October 26
    10:45 a.m.-11:45 a.m.
    104 A-B
    Paul Pride
    Klarity Logo

    This course provides an overview of the types of bolus available, their properties and target applications. It also will examine best practices for dose modification, skin sparing and contouring. Using specific examples, the speaker will explore a range of applications and the benefits of using bolus in different situations. The speaker also will demonstrate various types of bolus and techniques for molding and application.

    Paul Pride, R.T.(R)(T)

    • Gain a comprehensive knowledge of bolus applications.
    • Understand the different types of bolus available (e.g., polymer, gel-based).
    • Examine the overall benefits of using bolus and learn best practices for application.
    • Gain hands-on experience using and conforming bolus.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, D

  • Incorporating Trauma-informed Care Curriculum in Radiation Therapy Education
    Tuesday, October 26
    10:45 a.m.-11:45 a.m.
    105 A-D
    Maria Thompson
     

    Radiation therapists work with cancer patients on a daily basis at an intersection of cancer care and trauma. Recent research has demonstrated that health care professionals with training in trauma-informed care are better able to identify situations and language that may trigger trauma and to use an approach that will benefit patients. Research links traumatic events with negative health outcomes, and a curriculum in trauma-informed care teaches the participant to realize the effects of trauma, recognize signs of trauma (in patients, colleagues and themselves), avoid retraumatizing others, and advocate for policies, procedures and practices that support trauma-informed care. As the research continues to support trauma-informed approaches, curricular requirements for allied health care programs such as radiation therapy should include trauma-informed care. This course proposes a curricular model in trauma-informed care curriculum and how the assessment results may influence a profession curricular policy change.

    Maria Thompson, M.S., R.T.(T)

    • Understand the prevalence of trauma.
    • Identify the need for trauma-informed care curriculum.
    • Learn how to apply trauma-informed care teaching into existing courses.
    • Present a rationale for curricular changes.
    • Discuss further directions and research opportunities.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Using Peer Learning to Improve Students’ Clinical Self-efficacy
    Tuesday, October 26
    10:45 a.m.-11:45 a.m.
    106 A-B
    Ruth Hackworth Todd Hattie
     

    Students in radiation therapy are often provided clinical experience in a setting that is individualized to them and are often unaware of their potential development. This raises the question of whether they are performing at their maximum potential and are confident in their abilities. Studies have identified that the use of peer learning is a valuable tool in helping students to build critical thinking skills and self-efficacy in the clinical setting. This course will provide the data that identify the advantages of peer learning, the methods of implementation and the student results.

    Ruth Hackworth, M.S., R.T.(R)(T)

    Todd Hattie, B.S. R.T.(T)

    • Describe peer learning in clinical settings.
    • List necessary tools for implementing a student peer-learning process.
    • Define implementation strategies within clinical settings.
    • Identify the factors that students experience in an individualized clinical experience.
    • Compare areas in which students further developed clinically and personally.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

  • Klarity Presents
    All About Bolus: Techniques for Application, Molding and Skin-sparing
    Tuesday, October 26
    12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m.
    104 A-B
    Paul Pride
    Klarity Logo

    This course provides an overview of the types of bolus available, their properties and target applications. It also will examine best practices for dose modification, skin sparing and contouring. Using specific examples, the speaker will explore a range of applications and the benefits of using bolus in different situations. The speaker also will demonstrate various types of bolus and techniques for molding and application.

    Paul Pride, R.T.(R)(T)

    • Gain a comprehensive knowledge of bolus applications.
    • Understand the different types of bolus available (e.g., polymer, gel-based).
    • Examine the overall benefits of using bolus and learn best practices for application.
    • Gain hands-on experience using and conforming bolus.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B, D

  • Automation vs. Critical Thinking in Radiation Therapy
    Tuesday, October 26
    12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m.
    105 A-D
    Linda Schinman Maria Thompson Tracy White
     

    Automation in radiation therapy has had a profound and positive impact on accuracy, safety and workflow. This course will identify how automation relates to critical thinking and explain the importance of simulated practice in manual interventions when working with technology in radiation therapy. It also will increase attendees’ awareness of how automation affects critical thinking and how to limit automation dependency to achieve improved accuracy. The speakers will provide examples of how to improve critical thinking through simulated exercises in manual interventions.

    Linda Schinman, M.B.A., R.T.(T), CMD

    Maria Thompson, M.S., R.T.(T)

    Tracy White, M.S., R.T.(R)(T)

    • Explore differences in learning styles and opportunities among generations of radiation therapists and how those differences shape their perspective of automation.
    • Use simulated exercises to practice manual interventions and develop critical thinking skills.
    • Identify how automation has affected critical thinking in industries such as aviation and radiation therapy.
    • Identify when and how automation works in various clinical tasks.
    • Learn when, why and how to manually intervene.

    *CE Disclaimers

    A, B

 

Program subject to change.

*CE Disclaimers:

A: This course has been approved for 1 Category A credit.

B: This course has been approved for 1 MDCB credit.

C: ASRT has determined in its best judgment that this course has content directly related to the use of ionizing radiation and may be accepted as “direct” for Texas licensed R.T.s.

D: ASRT has determined in its best judgment that this course content meets requirements for California Licensed R.T.s. Radiologic Technologists listed in California can claim credit for this course by manually submitting their course completion information to the State of California.

E: ASRT has determined in its best judgment that this course content meets digital radiography requirements for California licensed R.T.s. Radiologic Technologists licensed in California can claim credit for this course by manually submitting their course completion information to the State of California.