Schedule of Events

Subject to change.

  • Saturday, Sept. 23


  • 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Registration and tote bag pick-up
    Palm Foyer

  • Sunday, Sept. 24


  • 7 a.m.
    Morning coffee
    Harbor A-C

  • 7 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Registration and tote bag pick-up
    Harbor A-C

  • 7 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Exhibits open
    Harbor A-C

  • 8-9 a.m.
    Course 001
    Sunday, Sept. 24, 8-9 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Ali Gilmore
    Seaport FGH
    In September 2010, Ali Gilmore was blindsided by a diagnosis of stage IV colon cancer. Since then she has undergone colon surgery, 27 cycles (4.5 rounds) of chemotherapy and targeted radiation therapy on both lungs. To date, Ali has published a book, taken up photography, covered Major League Soccer — including two MLS cup finals and David Beckham’s final MLS match — and professionally recorded and released a full length CD of her original music. Oh yeah, and she beat stage IV cancer — twice.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Describe Ali's journey to survivorship.
    • Discuss the struggles she faced.
    • Explain what's next for Ali.

  • 9:25-10:25 a.m.
    Course 002
    Sunday, Sept. 24, 9:25-10:25 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Carmen Ayala, M.S.W., LCSW
    Seaport FGH
    What is compassion fatigue? Do you suffer from it? As a health care worker — especially working in radiation therapy — you might be a victim of compassion fatigue. We will explore the signs and symptoms associated with compassion fatigue, as well as the related emotions. The speaker will talk about how to recognize and maintain professional boundaries and still find fulfillment in your chosen profession. She also will offer some ways of dealing with compassion fatigue and how to keep it from affecting you, your personal and professional life and, ultimately, your patients.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Explain how compassion fatigues affects radiation therapy professionals.
    • Discover ways to work without falling victim to compassion fatigue.
    • Recognize compassion fatigue, as well as the signs and symptoms.
    • Identify professional boundaries and fulfillment.
    • Promote compassion fatigue recovery, self-care and resilience.

  • 10:50-11:50 a.m.
    Course 003
    Sunday, Sept. 24, 10:50-11:50 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Charles Washington, M.B.A., R.T.(T), FASRT
    Seaport FGH
    As practitioners prepare for a productive career in radiation oncology, the initial focus tends to be on scalable technical expertise. Although technical skills are essential to qualify for positions, there is more to consider in maintaining and thriving within the field. Noncognitive competencies, such as tenacity, perseverance and grit, must be factored into the equation. These competencies are part of the essential preparation points in building a career in radiation oncology practice. The speaker also will discuss recognition and measurement of noncognitive competencies.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the components of career planning in radiation oncology.
    • Define the concepts of tenacity, perseverance and grit as they relate to practice.
    • Compare and contrast thoughts in the development of the noncognitive competencies essential for successful practice.
    • Describe environmental models and opportunities that promote command of these competencies.

  • 11:50 a.m.-1:20 p.m.
    Lunch provided
    Harbor D-I

  • 1:30-2:30 p.m.
    Course 004
    Sunday, Sept. 24, 1:30-2:30 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Jordan Johnson, M.S.H.A., R.T.(R)(T), ROCC and Cheryl Turner, Ed.D., R.T.(R)(T).
    Seaport FGH
    This course is designed to inform participants of the tenets of ethical practices as required by licensing bodies, while engaging in open dialogue of often unspoken misrepresentations in clinical settings. The onset of social media and leadership engagement have divulged that ethical ”secrets” remain hidden in cancer treatment centers. The speakers look to past cases of onlooker phenomenon, bullying and medical errors to search for solutions, risk mitigation and advocacy. Active discussion will encourage the audience to press for best practices in patient care and radiation therapist well-being.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Describe the tenets of ethical behavior.
    • Identify ethical behavior in clinical settings.
    • Describe bullying, unethical behaviors and red flags.
    • Participate in discussion for radiation therapy advocacy and potential solutions.
    • Explain best practices for patient care and better practices for radiation therapist well-being.

  • 2:45 p.m.
    ASRT Update
    Seaport FGH

  • Immediately following
    ARRT Report
    Seaport FGH

  • Immediately following
    JRCERT Report
    Seaport FGH

  • Immediately following
    Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Chapters and Educators Update
    Seaport FGH

  • Monday, Sept. 25


  • Breakfast on your own

  • 7 a.m.
    Morning coffee
    Harbor A-C

  • 7 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Morning coffee
    Palm Foyer

  • 7 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Exhibits open
    Harbor A-C

  • 8-9 a.m.
    Course 005
    Monday, Sept. 25, 8-9 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Gurvinder Singh, M.Sc.
    Harbor DE
    The radiation oncology department is a major part of any cancer center. Radiation therapists, radiation oncologists and medical physicists are part of a multidisciplinary team that struggles daily with complicated, time-consuming treatment setups and huge patients loads (up to 250 patients per day). One study sought to drive a radiation therapy workload using patient data related to treatment information on teletherapy treatment units at the authors’ institute, where five linear accelerators are in use. A study author will present the findings.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Manage patient setup and positioning errors.
    • Improve quality of site-specific target delineation during imaging and analysis of planned and delivered fraction.
    • Discuss major challenges faced by therapists using IGRT.
    • Recognize the importance of periodic monitoring of target verification.
    • Have direct responsibility for the final administration of a prescribed course of radiation therapy.

  • 8-9 a.m.
    Course 006
    Monday, Sept. 25, 8-9 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Eric Chambers, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Seaport FG
    Discover a novel radiation oncology workflow and resource utilization process that allow the uninterrupted setup, volume acquisition, treatment planning and delivery of external-beam radiation, all with a single departmental resource: the linear accelerator. Attendees will learn the conditions favorable to conducting such a treatment, as well as the theoretical foundation and technical details of execution. The course also covers inline process improvement that occurred during the development and subsequent clinical implementation of this technique, as well as exploring potential growth and wider applications of the discussed workflow. This process is brought to life in the speaker’s department, and it allows the staff some flexibility with resource and time pressures. Using a streamlined process on the linear accelerator allows staff to spare the resource of a CT scanner and deliver a patient’s first treatment beam in the shortest possible time, in a single-room procedure, without sacrificing 3-D volume acquisition and traditional treatment planning.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Explain the benefit of the consolidated workflow model presented.
    • Identify the practical applications of the technique discussed.
    • Describe the step-by-step execution and specific roles of involved professionals.
    • Discuss future applications and expansions of the concept.

  • 8-9 a.m.
    Course 007
    Monday, Sept. 25, 8-9 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Margaret Straub, M.S., PA-C
    Seaport GH
    Although radiation therapists are well versed in the assessment and treatment of patients’ acute side effects, therapists rarely hear what patients experience in the years that follow treatment. Patients who receive pelvic radiation for a gynecologic, prostate or lower gastrointestinal cancers might be cured of their disease but often experience post-treatment complications that affect their quality of life. Diarrhea, sexual dysfunction, bladder spasms and pelvic insufficiency fractures are just some of the unfortunate side effects. Hope for these patients is not lost: Radiation treatments and interventions can reduce the impact of these adverse effects. Radiation therapists can help improve the quality of life for some pelvic radiation patients by becoming aware of techniques, resources and interventions. In addition, radiation therapists who attend this course will better understand how they can assist patients in reducing future complications through education and advocacy while undergoing pelvic radiation therapy.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Explain how and why pelvic radiation patients suffer negative outcomes from treatment.
    • Identify common — and maybe not-so-common — complications that negatively affect patient quality of life.
    • Share techniques that reduce and treat pelvic radiation complications.
    • Discuss research to help reduce complications of pelvic radiation therapy.
    • Provide specific strategies to assist patients while they undergo radiation therapy to potentially reduce or eliminate future long-term complications.

  • 8-9 a.m.
    Course 008
    Monday, Sept. 25, 8-9 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Joel Elden, B.S., R.T.(R)(T) and Amanda Schoenberger, A.A.S., R.T.(R)(T)
    Seaport H
    Come learn about the procedures and benefits of performing Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery for nonmalignant conditions. Gamma Knife technology makes it possible to treat inoperable brain tumors, benign lesions and functional disorders to a higher dose with high precision. In addition, Gamma Knife has been used to treat benign conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia, arteriovenous malformation and essential tremors. Because Gamma Knife treatment is predominantly an outpatient procedure with high dose in a single fraction, an extremely precise treatment is warranted. The new ICON with daily imaging and gating capabilities provides better localization and tracking during treatment. This course offers details about Gamma Knife technology, clinical workflow, the logistics of the patient setup and treatment, quality assurance, and patient safety. In addition, the speakers will present clinical experience as well as current protocols and patient outcomes.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Discuss clinical use of the Gamma Knife and functional disorders.
    • Identify treatment procedures for nonmalignant lesions and functional disorders using Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery.
    • Explain patient safety in a Gamma Knife procedure.
    • Apply treatment protocols and outcomes with the Gamma Knife.

  • 8-9 a.m.
    Course 009
    Monday, Sept. 25, 8-9 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Jason Stanford, Ph.D., R.T.(R)(T), CMD, DABR
    Harbor I
    Craniospinal irradiation is the most complicated format of conventional external-beam radiation therapy because it involves matching noncoplanar beams and gap calculation. The speaker will discuss new approaches and an in-depth overview of the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s “field in field” procedure.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Identify various techniques employed in craniospinal irradiation.
    • Explain the advantages and limitations associated with each technique.
    • Recognize how to perform a “gap calculation” and evaluate its efficacy.
    • Identify high-risk areas in craniospinal irradiation and implement quality assurance methods to mitigate severe errors.

  • 8-9 a.m.
    Course WS001
    Monday, Sept. 25, 8-9 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Elizabeth Chabner Thompson, M.D., M.P.H.; Amanda Jasek, B.S., R.T.(R)(T) and Ashley Palacios, R.T.(T)
    Harbor F
    This presentation focuses on the challenges that accompany effective supine and prone breast setups. The speakers will give particular attention to the inherent positioning and dosimetric challenges of pendulous breasts. They will share tips and techniques, as well an examination of a novel approach to supine setup. This presentation includes a hands-on session featuring both prone and supine setups.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Identify the challenges in supine and prone breast setups.
    • Recognize the benefits and shortcomings of various setup methods.
    • Understand techniques and remedies for improved breast setups.

  • 9:20-10:20 a.m.
    Course 010
    Monday, Sept. 25, 9:20-10:20 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Cheryl Turner, Ed.D., R.T.(R)(T)
    Harbor DE
    This course is designed to reflect on the results of original research that investigated stress and coping in radiation therapists. Stress and coping had not been studied in U.S. radiation therapists in almost two decades, leaving a gap in research and in professional practice. The presenter will actively engage the audience with data and real-life experiences to strive to work toward positive clinical strategies.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Define and describe stress and coping.
    • Identify stressful encounters and the need for effective coping.
    • Apply stress management skills andcoping mechanisms.
    • Explain the connection between stress and working environment.
    • Formulate ideas and plans to foster increased personal well-being.

  • 9:20-10:20 a.m.
    Course 011
    Monday, Sept. 25, 9:20-10:20 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Suzanne Smith, M.Sc., PgDip
    Seaport FG
    Look at features available in the Varian Eclipse Planning System to help deliver improvements and advances in complex planning scenarios, specifically radiosurgery. HyperArc is a new solution for radiosurgery planning and treatment, offering an improved method of reducing normal tissue doses and compacting isodose lines. Streamlining the treatment delivery process through automation simplifies noncoplanar treatment deliveries while eliminating the risk of collisions. This presentation describes HyperArc, comparing this solution with standard radiosurgery planning techniques, and approaches and the benefits it offers. The speaker will review the RapidPlan model development and the benefits of adopting this knowledge-based planning system. She also will address how it can improve and standardize plan quality, as well as offer examples of RapidPlan implementation as part of an adaptive planning solution in the clinic. The presentation details the benefits of incorporating multicriteria optimization, a new feature in Eclipse, to further enhance plan quality metrics. The final part of the presentation covers how RapidPlan, MCO and HyperArc can be combined to offer sophisticated planning solutions.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Compare HyperArc radiosurgery planning with standard RapidArc-based planning.
    • Implement RapidPlan for a variety of clinical sites.
    • Describe multicriteria optimization within the Eclipse Planning System.
    • Identify the benefits of combining these new tools for complex planning scenarios.

  • 9:20-10:20 a.m.
    Course 012
    Monday, Sept. 25, 9:20-10:20 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Samantha Skubish, M.S., R.T.(R)(T)
    Seaport GH
    New recommended guidelines for low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening represent one of the largest changes and opportunities in cancer screening management since mammography was embraced for breast cancer screening. Lung screening for a high-risk population provides clinicians the chance to diagnose and treat lung cancer at an early stage, often increasing a patient’s chance for survival. The clinical management of this new patient population offers challenges and opportunities for radiation therapists and likely will change the way we treat lung cancer patients long-term. This session reviews the evolution of lung cancer screening, offers updates on current LDCT lung cancer screening guidelines and discusses the opportunities this new tool offers for all stakeholders. It also explores best practices and case studies on stereotactic body radiation therapy as a key component to the comprehensive care of the LDCT lung screening patient population.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the need for and development of lung cancer screening.
    • Identify current guidelines and recommendations from professional and regulating entities.
    • Explore the challenges and opportunities that exist for all stakeholders involved in the care of lung cancer patients.
    • Examine case studies and best practices for screening, diagnosing and treating early stage lung cancer.
    • Recognize the benefits of SBRT for early stage lung cancer and the anticipated changes to the long-term care of the patient population overall.

  • 9:20-10:20 a.m.
    Course 013
    Monday, Sept. 25, 9:20-10:20 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Justin Pigg, B.S., R.T.(R)(T)
    Seaport H
    The purpose of this presentation is to inform and educate fellow therapists about the unique aspects of proton therapy. The speaker will explain the distinct differences in proton therapy vs. conventional therapy, and attendees will learn the specific nuances of proton therapy and how they are applied to patient treatments.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Describe the basics of proton beam production.
    • Recognize the differences in proton beam vs. photon characteristics.
    • Discuss the different beam delivery methods.
    • Explain patient imaging procedures and setup.
    • Compare proton treatment plans vs. photon treatment plans.

  • 9:20-10:20 a.m.
    Course 014
    Monday, Sept. 25, 9:20-10:20 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Lee Culp, M.S., R.T.(T), CMD
    Harbor I
    Evaluate and compare the techniques (free breathing vs. deep inspiration breath hold vs. prone setup) in which OSU dosimetrists plan for their breast patients. After a brief informational introduction to the different modalities, the speaker will introduce a mock patient. Attendees will delve into planning a patient at OSU enrolled in RTOG Protocol 13282. Using a fusion of CT and MR in prone treatment position for design and evaluation purposes, a treatment plan is constructed to treat tumor volume while sparing normal breast tissue. This is how we see the future of breast radiation therapy planning: in the prone position, presurgery, most likely with IMRT. Cohort 1 has already been completed at OSU, and we expect to enroll 30 patients by completion. The presenter also will mention the initial submission of OSU 16106 protocol for intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy boost at the time of breast-conserving surgery.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Accurately reproduce prone setup.
    • Fuse MR in prone treatment position with CT to define target volume.
    • Treat partial breast with IMRT in prone position using constraints from protocol-hypofractionated BID.

  • 10:40-11:40 a.m.
    Course 015
    Monday, Sept. 25, 10:40-11:40 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Ronald DiGiaimo, M.B.A., FACHE
    Harbor DE
    This session covers the basic, intermediate and complex coding scenarios of radiation oncology. Attendees will learn the 2017 rules, proposed 2018 rules and practical tips to coding that can be implemented immediately upon return to the clinic. The speaker will cover specific radiation oncology codes and how they are documented, plus useful combinations for total treatment regimens (e.g., prostate, breast and lung). He also will illustrate coding differences between IMRT, SRS, brachytherapy and infusion therapy.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Explain documentation requirements.
    • Discuss new and possible coding changes for 2017 and 2018.
    • Apply gained knowledge to your hospital or freestanding clinic.
    • Help to ensure compliance.
    • Support the financial aspects by capturing codes appropriately and minimizing risk.

  • 10:40-11:40 a.m.
    Course 016
    Monday, Sept. 25, 10:40-11:40 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Jason Gregory, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Location: Seaport FG
    This presentation highlights some common errors in imaging breast tangents and electron breast boosts and demonstrates how to image them accurately. The speaker will discuss common breast tangent setup mistakes, including making table adjustments without verifying isocenter. Using some basic trigonometry, he also will show how even an image-matching software can mislead a therapist to set up a patient incorrectly by relying on 2-D mathematics instead of taking into account the 3-D space in which we work. He will show methods of breast tangent imaging that verify the isocenter in a 3-D space ensuring accurate treatments. He then will describe a common method of imaging electron breast boosts and explain how the juxtaposition of the block cutout in the electron frame can lead to mistakes if you rely on the graticule/DRR isocenter. This presentation shows actual clinical setups and images to aid in the visualization and understanding of the processes with the ultimate goal of bettering patient care through more accurate and scientifically based imaging methods.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the importance of isocenter localization in breast imaging.
    • Recognize some processes to avoid that can lead to imprecise setups.
    • Describe the relationship between the electron block field edge and isocenter in hand-cut blocks.
    • Review basic trigonometric principles and apply them to the clinic.

  • 10:40-11:40 a.m.
    Course 017
    Monday, Sept. 25, 10:40-11:40 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Harbor GH
    The world of health care delivery is increasingly complex and coupled with dynamic changes in work practice patterns. The purpose of the study supporting this talk is to analyze current metrics and try to analytically predict practices and principles of radiation therapist clinical patterns. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, social factors, economic factors, political factors and technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes might occur in the job structure and content of radiation therapist clinical practice. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each change factor and how the predicted outcome can change.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Identify clinical practice concepts in radiation therapy and how the concepts and principles might change.
    • Discuss how evolutionary and revolutionary philosophy affects workplace practice.
    • Recognize how economics, politics, technology and social culture affect radiation therapists.
    • Describe how metrics influence clinical practice patterns.
    • Explain what external threats influence clinical practice.

  • 10:40-11:40 a.m.
    Course 018
    Monday, Sept. 25, 10:40-11:40 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Emily Sinclair, M.Sc., MRT(T)
    Seaport H
    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of cancer, subdivided into uncomplicated and advanced cases. When BCC progresses to an advanced state, treatment options are very limited. Erivedge (vismodegib) recently was approved in Canada for treating adult patients with histologically confirmed metastatic or locally advanced BCC where surgery or radiation therapy is not appropriate. Erivedge is only available through a controlled distribution program, and physicians must provide rationale for why surgery or radiation cannot be considered. The Health Canada approval of Erivedge is based on results from a pivotal international, single-arm, multicenter, two-cohort, open-label, phase II study that enrolled 104 patients with advanced BCC. The speaker will report the early outcomes of two patients treated with Erivedge, demonstrated with clinical photographs.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the dangers of basal cell carcinomas.
    • Assess a drug that might give hope to people with advanced basal cell carcinoma.
    • Recognize images from two case studies.
    • Identify reasonable side effects for the acquired results.

  • 10:40-11:40 a.m.
    Course 019
    Monday, Sept. 25, 10:40-11:40 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Barbara Agrimson, B.S., R.T.(R)(T), CMD
    Harbor I
    Treatment plan readiness has been out of compliance for completion of final approvals of complex treatment plans prior to the patients’ treatment start date. This creates stress for staff members, leading to potential treatment plan errors for the patient. Dosimetry staff is rushed to complete the treatment plan, physics staff works extended hours to perform the treatment plan quality assurance, and radiation therapists often are left with little time to check the treatment plan adequately before patients arrive. With the help of an American Society of Clinical Oncology quality training program, we created a structured approach to improve the completion rate of radiation treatment plans. We used plan-do-study-act cycles over several months and found an outcome of a much higher percentage of plans completed on time with adequate time for QA.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Provide a safe and effective treatment for patients, reduce staff burnout and improve work efficiency.
    • Identify the process involved in the lean change management strategy.
    • Recognize the benefits and challenges involved in developing and launching a department workflow process.
    • Explain how computer quality-control lists are useful for tracking and acquiring statistical data.

  • 10:40-11:40 a.m.
    Course WS002
    Monday, Sept. 25, 10:40-11:40 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Elizabeth Chabner Thompson, M.D., M.P.H.; Amanda Jasek, B.S., R.T.(R)(T) and Ashley Palacios, R.T.(T)
    Harbor F
    This presentation focuses on the challenges that accompany effective supine and prone breast setups. The speakers will give particular attention to the inherent positioning and dosimetric challenges of pendulous breasts. They will share tips and techniques, as well an examination of a novel approach to supine setup. This presentation includes a hands-on session featuring both prone and supine setups.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Identify the challenges in supine and prone breast setups.
    • Recognize the benefits and shortcomings of various setup methods.
    • Understand techniques and remedies for improved breast setups.

  • 11:40 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Lunch on your own

  • 1:10-2:10 p.m.
    Course 020
    Monday, Sept. 25, 1:10-2:10 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Natasha Hadrych-Rosier, M.H.A., M.B.A., R.T.(R)(T) and Sandra Hayden, M.A., R.T.(T), FASRT
    Harbor DE
    The focus of this session is to give an overview of the different employment and career paths available to radiation therapists. The speakers will provide information gathered from individuals with experience in these areas. In addition, they will discuss the steps to success, how to stand out from the crowd, how to improve communication and what employers in these areas are looking for. Attendees will learn to identify ways to deal with change and how it can be advantageous.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Identify avenues of employment and career paths for therapists.
    • Discuss the steps to success.
    • Examine how to stand out in the crowd.
    • Determine areas of the profession that need radiation therapy expertise.
    • Review how change is necessary and unavoidable — and how to use it to your advantage.

  • 1:10-2:10 p.m.
    Course 021
    Monday, Sept. 25, 1:10-2:10 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Renee Gutierrez, B.A., R.T.(T) and Timothy Herman, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Seaport FG
    This lecture presents the history of total skin electron therapy (TSET) and describes its contemporary use for radiation oncology patients. Attendees will learn about indications for TSET and how it is used for late-stage lymphoma. The speakers will describe the various treatment positions and devices used at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, the unique challenges this procedure presents and how treatment is tailored to each patient’s individual needs. They also will present case studies of patients treated at our facility and discuss the overall effectiveness of TSET treatments.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Summarize the history of total skin treatment.
    • Identify important considerations when performing the treatment.
    • Perform a TSET simulation in the treatment room.
    • Discuss the history and evolution of TSET treatments at NMH.
    • Recognize options for various side effects that patients encounter.

  • 1:10-2:10 p.m.
    Course 022
    Monday, Sept. 25, 1:10-2:10 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Marie Bass, A.A.S., R.T.(R)(T) and Breann Bollinger, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Harbor GH
    Health care workers and patients are exposed to many environmental dangers in the health care setting. These dangers could include workplace violence, domestic abuse and self-harm. Radiation therapists often develop close relationships with patients and might detect a patient in danger from a caretaker or from himself or herself. In addition to patient endangerment, a health care worker could face workplace violence from the patient, a co-worker or a stranger. This presentation discusses types of health care dangers, how to recognize endangerment and appropriate actions and responses.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • List health care dangers.
    • Recognize environmental endangerment.
    • Discuss suicide among cancer patients.
    • Respond to a hostile situation.

  • 1:10-2:10 p.m.
    Course 023
    Monday, Sept. 25, 1:10-2:10 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Carol Scherbak, M.S.R.S., R.T.(T)
    Seaport H
    This course examines integrating a 3-D virtual linear accelerator across the ASRT Radiation Therapy Curriculum. Implementing this plan required a complete rethink of teaching strategies and delivery. These changes can be overwhelming because they require the educator to promote active learning and stray away from more traditional teaching techniques. Fortunately, the improvements in student comprehension and retention are well worth the effort. Even though the techniques presented are for a 3-D virtual linac, these changes also can be applied in programs without this technology.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Define active learning.
    • Describe the benefits of student participation in comprehension and retention.
    • Discover commonalities in content.

  • 1:10-2:10 p.m.
    Course 024
    Monday, Sept. 25, 1:10-2:10 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Kristen Vu, M.S., R.T.(T), CMD
    Harbor H
    In 2011, the American Society for Radiation Oncology released guidelines for the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of palliative bone metastases. ASTRO concluded that for most patients 8 Gy in one fraction is a safe and effective treatment with shorter acute radiation side effects than multifraction treatment. The ASTRO authors concluded that the United States has delayed using the single-fraction treatment dose and suggested the dose regimen should change. The study set out to evaluate the treatment fractionation schedule of individuals with bone metastases based on outpatient Medicare billing. The investigated factors include overall number of single vs. multiple fraction treatments and if the number of fractions correlated to primary malignancy, age, sex, race or geographical region. The results showed that primary malignancy and demographic data were not associated with the prescribing habits of radiation oncologists and highlighted the importance of the treatment options for palliative bone metastasis patients.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Describe the three standard dose fractionations of palliative bony metastases.
    • Explain which patient population most commonly receives the single-fraction prescription.
    • Discuss why ASTRO recommends single-fraction treatment for most patients.

  • 1:10-2:10 p.m.
    Course WS003
    Monday, Sept. 25, 1:10-2:10 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Bill Barnat, A.A., and Sean Santoscoy, B.A., R.T.(T)
    Harbor F
    Please note that this workshop was offered last year. Unless you have transitioned into a new biennium, you will not receive CE credit this year if you attended the workshop in 2016.
    Attendees will hear an overview of the latest guidelines for stereotactic radiation therapy, as well as common set-up challenges. The presenters also will discuss emerging trends and the effect on future patient setups and offer a hands-on demonstration of various techniques.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Describe governing guidelines for inter- and intra-fraction motion management in stereotactic radiation therapy.
    • Identify the set-up challenges common to stereotactic radiation therapy.
    • Discuss the benefits and deficits of various respiratory management techniques.
    • Understand the emerging trends that will affect future patient set-ups.

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
    Course 025
    Monday, Sept. 25, 2:30-3:30 p.m. (Advanced)
    Advanced
    Presented by John Maamoun, M.Sc., MRT(T)
    Harbor DE
    This course is designed to enhance users’ appreciation of the scope of patients’ supportive care needs and the patients’ desire for assistance in meeting those needs. Attendees will hear data that demonstrate the need for a defined and intentional process for early identification of the radiation therapy patients’ supportive care needs, including assessment and intervention, within the physical, psychosomatic and practical domains. Attendees should gain awareness of implications of unmet supportive care needs for the patient and the treating facility. The speaker will underscore the role of radiation therapists and institutions in mitigating the implications of unmet patient supportive care needs. He also will review practical processes and tools to improve patient satisfaction and overall experience.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Appreciate the effect of cancer and its treatment on the radiation therapy patient.
    • Recognize the magnitude and implications of unmet patient supportive care needs.
    • Explain the rationale for early and routine patient screening and assessment.
    • Identify the various tools used in mitigating the implications of unmet patient supportive care needs.
    • Describe processes designed to respond to patient supportive care needs.

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
    Course 026
    Monday, Sept. 25, 2:30-3:30 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Cheryl Young, M.S., R.T.(T)
    Seaport FG
    Social media is a prevalent tool that has become more and more popular for organizational outreach. Patient interactions with radiation therapy personnel can foster a social media relationship between the patient and employee. There are risks and benefits of ‘friending’ one another, including potential sharing of protected patient information. This presentation highlights the uses of social media in radiation therapy and the related ethical issues a therapist could face.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Define social media.
    • Discuss instances of social media used in health care.
    • Identify professional and ethical issues when using social media in health care.
    • Review ethical case examples.
    • Make policy recommendations for use of social media in radiation therapy.

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
    Course 027
    Monday, Sept. 25, 2:30-3:30 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Christopher Schuman, M.S.M., R.T.(T), CMD
    Harbor GH
    The focus of this session is to provide an overview of the automated offline adaptive radiation therapy process for Tomotherapy systems. The speaker will discuss the components and key aspects of offline adaptive radiation therapy, including deformation, dose monitoring, evaluating trending data and plan and treatment adaptation. In addition, he will discuss the challenges and process of replanning and retreating patients who already received radiation therapy treatment.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Define “adaptive radiation therapy” and the differences between online and offline.
    • Identify the value, use and limitations of daily IGRT images for dose monitoring.
    • Discuss the concept, value and quality assurance of structure, dose deformation. 
    • Review the daily physician reports, including daily and accumulated dose, trending data and triggers.
    • Recognize when anatomical and dosimetric changes make replanning necessary.
    • Discuss the process of adapting a treatment plan.
    • Explain how automating the adaptive process can improve efficiency.
    • Examine the process issues of retreating the same anatomical areas in patients.

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
    Course 028
    Monday, Sept. 25, 2:30-3:30 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Kimberly LaGuardia, M.H.A., R.T.(T) and Awais Mirza, R.T.(T)
    Seaport H
    The purpose of this course is to revisit basic lifesaving techniques for health care workers. The speaker will demonstrate how to assess for signs of a stroke, cardiac arrest, anaphylaxis, hypoglycemia and other acute emergencies that can occur within a radiation oncology facility. Because radiation therapists are primary caregivers who serve as front-line advocates for patients, they should be able to determine whether the symptoms are related to radiation therapy or other medical emergencies. They also should know how to react when patients present with these symptoms.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Identify common life-threatening symptoms.
    • Differentiate between life-threatening and nonlife-threatening situations.
    • Call for help when necessary.
    • Initiate immediate care for a patient.
    • Implement policy and procedures within departments.

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
    Course 029
    Monday, Sept. 25, 2:30-3:30 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Shellie Warino, M.Ed., R.T.(R)(T), CHES
    Harbor I
    This course offers attendees an interactive review of contrast media use in radiation therapy treatment planning. Radiation therapists should understand when and why contrast media is indicated and who is qualified to administer contrast for radiation therapy treatment planning. The presenter also will discuss contrast media distribution, routes of administration and potential adverse reactions.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Explain the use of contrast media for radiation therapy treatment planning.
    • Differentiate among minor and major adverse reactions to contrast media.
    • Discuss the difference between positive and negative contrast media.
    • Describe the routes of contrast media administration.

  • 3:50-4:50 p.m.
    Course 030
    Monday, Sept. 25, 3:50-4:50 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by James Victoria, A.A.S., R.T.(R)(T), CMD
    Harbor DE
    The introduction of imaging technologies into the treatment room for patient setup and alignment directly affected the accuracy and precision of treatment delivery. Early imaging systems allowed therapists to visualize and align the patient based on surrogates, such as implanted markers or bony anatomy, which helped improve patient setup. Further developments resulted in availability of in-room magnetic resonance, which enables direct visualization of soft-tissue targets. Overall, imaging has improved clinical outcomes, and imaging advances will continue to improve localization, targeting and deliverability. MR and soft-tissue imaging will support the delineation and targeting of daily treatments. In addition, MR imaging during treatment will confirm the treatment volume during delivery and allow for improvements in motion management as well as setup. This presentation also describes the advancements of in-room imaging and the role of the therapists in implementing the technology.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Summarize MR-guided therapy and the advantages of merging technologies.
    • Use existing standards of practice to advance radiation therapy.
    • Explore future impacts on existing clinical practice.

  • 3:50-4:50 p.m.
    Course 031
    Monday, Sept. 25, 3:50-4:50 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Jason Gregory, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Seaport FG
    Emerging data exists on the important role of diet and nutrition in conjunction with traditional medicine. Specific nutritional and dietary adherence can lead to better outcomes, including improved ability to cope with adverse effects. Some studies on rats demonstrate that ketogenic diets and intermittent fasting can enhance tumor control and decrease recurrence. Similar nutritional approaches in humans have yielded fewer adverse effects from certain chemotherapy regimens. In addition, some phytonutrients in cruciferous vegetables have antitumor effects and can play a role in prevention and treatment. An ever-increasing body of literature shows the detrimental effects of sugar and carbohydrate overconsumption. Attendees will get an in-depth look at how and why these nutritional and dietary processes work. The speaker also will discuss dietary guidelines and nutritional practices in radiation oncology and evaluate them against the most recent science.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Discuss recent research on the benefits of specific dietary practices in conjunction with traditional treatment.
    • Summarize the research on the adverse effects of sugar and carbohydrate overconsumption on general health and in regard to cancer.
    • Explain how and why these specific dietary practices affect the body.
    • Critically evaluate current dietary guidelines for patients.

  • 3:50-4:50 p.m.
    Course 032
    Monday, Sept. 25, 3:50-4:50 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Laura Alipoon, Ed.D., Ed.S., R.T.(R) and Carol Davis, Dr.PH., Psy.D., R.T.(T)
    Harbor GH
    In this presentation, the speakers will discuss the underlying tenets of emotional intelligence and its effect on health care. They will share the effects of enhanced EI competencies on levels of compassion and empathetic patient care, personal and professional growth, exceptional performance, teamwork and communication. They also will discuss how EI can be embedded into the health care environment.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Examine emotional intelligence theory components and recognize areas for professional and organizational growth.
    • Identify steps for managing an amygdala hijack.
    • Apply EI strategies to daily workplace situations, relationships and challenges.

  • 3:50-4:50 p.m.
    Course 033
    Monday, Sept. 25, 3:50-4:50 p.m. (Advanced)
    Advanced
    Presented by Karen Coleman, B.Sc.(Hons.), HDCR, FNZIMRT
    Seaport H
    Hear an educator’s perspective on establishing and sustaining an interprofessional education (IPE) program. These guidelines are developed from common sense as well as formal research and evaluation. Each IPE program differs, and how these guidelines are applied depends on local factors, such as organizational support, educator involvement, student numbers and disciplines. However, a commonality is the rich learning for IPE educators and students. Although much is written about IPE benefits, including improved outcomes for students, health care teams and patients, little guidance is available for educators to develop an interprofessional education program.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Act as a champion for IPE and keep IPE as the goal.
    • Establish a common vision, and compromise where necessary.
    • Enroll a range of disciplines according to the goals for each IPE program.
    • View the IPE class as a whole regardless of discipline.

  • 3:50-4:50 p.m.
    Course 034
    Monday, Sept. 25, 3:50-4:50 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Timmerie Cohen, Ph.D., R.T.(R)(T), CMD
    Harbor I
    This course explores the current trends in the diagnosis, treatment and long-term prognosis of malignant melanoma. Attendees will become familiar with the current modes of diagnosis, especially the use of imaging studies. The speaker will examine the important roles of CT, MR, PET and sonography, as well as the roles of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and immunotherapy in multimodality treatment of malignant melanoma. She also will examine the long-term prognosis of malignant melanoma as it relates to staging.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Review etiology and epidemiology of malignant melanoma.
    • Recognize the signs and symptoms of malignant melanoma.
    • Discuss the role of imaging modalities in the diagnosis of malignant melanoma.
    • Present the roles of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and immunotherapy in the treatment of malignant melanoma.
    • Discuss future trends in the detection, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of malignant melanoma.

  • 3:50-4:50 p.m.
    Course WS004
    Monday, Sept. 25, 3:50-4:50 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Bill Barnat, A.A., and Sean Santoscoy, B.A., R.T.(T)
    Harbor F
    Attendees will hear an overview of the latest guidelines for stereotactic radiation therapy, as well as common set-up challenges. The presenters also will discuss emerging trends and the effect on future patient setups and offer a hands-on demonstration of various techniques.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Describe governing guidelines for inter- and intra-fraction motion management in stereotactic radiation therapy.
    • Identify the set-up challenges common to stereotactic radiation therapy.
    • Discuss the benefits and deficits of various respiratory management techniques.
    • Understand the emerging trends that will affect future patient set-ups.

  • Tuesday, Sept. 26


  • Breakfast on your own

  • 7 a.m.
    Morning coffee
    Harbor A-C

  • 7-11:30 a.m.
    Registration and tote bag pick-up
    Harbor A-C

  • 7-11:30 a.m.
    Exhibits open
    Harbor A-C

  • 7:30-8:30 a.m.
    Course 035
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 7:30-8:30 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Leslie Waldrop, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Harbor DE
    The purpose of this course is to increase attendees’ ability to harbor honesty during difficult times. In oncology, communication skills are key to achieving the important goals of the clinical encounter. This course will explore who benefits from open communication, common barriers, expected outcomes and how to implement effective processes. The speaker will explain the SPIKES method and how, with it, the patient can better understand and trust the provider. Attendees will hear examples of how effective communication and honesty support radiation oncology patients.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Communicate effectively about different topics.
    • Relieve patient stress and anxiety.
    • Build comfortable relationships with patients.
    • Increase hope with honesty.
    • Use the SPIKES method effectively.

  • 7:30-8:30 a.m.
    Course 036
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 7:30-8:30 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Timothy Meier, R.T.(R)(T)
    Seaport FG
    Over the past eight years, the Cleveland Clinic has used performance improvement data reported electronically via a short online form on the department website, which is reviewed every two weeks. Because safety checklists and procedural timeouts are a national patient-safety goal standard and are required for procedures with more than minimal safety risk to patients, we instituted a presimulation safety checklist. This forced verbal communication occurs between the therapist and physician prior to the patient’s simulation. A pocket safety checklist card was created and distributed to all physicians. The radiation therapist initiated the safety check by paging the physician before the start of the simulation. The therapist reviews every item on the card, and the physician verbally acknowledges the accuracy and completeness of all items. A pretreatment second safety checklist was implemented in 2016. We have been auditing compliance of safety checklist/timeout documentation for a few years and recently added a second timeout in the machine console control room. During a recent survey, The Joint Commission acknowledged this second timeout as a best practice.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Implement a thorough safety timeout using a presimulation checklist.
    • Discuss the use of second timeouts prior to treatment and how to audit compliance.
    • Suggest an efficient process improvement program in your department.

  • 7:30-8:30 a.m.
    Course 037
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 7:30-8:30 a.m. (Advanced)
    Advanced
    Presented by Nidhi Parikh, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Harbor GH
    This course reviews the Lahey Hospital & Medical Center assessment method leading to individualized motion management to minimize target motion primarily for patients undergoing pancreas and liver stereotactic body radiation therapy. The speaker will guide attendees in adopting this method to target the treatment area using implanted markers and to only deliver during certain phases of the breathing cycle while coaching the patient to remain free-breathing, exhale-hold or inhale-hold. Attendees also will hear the data and statistics of the cases and the results of the treatment mode based on the motion seen in the conventional simulator at the initial assessment.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Identify motion management techniques for patients undergoing liver and pancreasSBRT .
    • Describe the coaching techniques and variability in the coaching methods.
    • Implement this initial patient coaching and assessment session.
    • Notice the difference in motion of implanted markers.
    • Discuss tips to resolve issues that arise on the treatment machine.

  • 7:30-8:30 a.m.
    Course 038
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 7:30-8:30 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Courtney Hallinan, M.H.A., R.T.(T)
    Harbor GH
    Accelerated partial-breast irradiation (ABPI) focuses higher doses of radiation during a shorter interval to the lumpectomy cavity in breast-conserving therapy in early stage breast cancer. APBI has become more widespread in the past decade because of the shorter treatment schedule and numerous sources of data showing positive cosmetic outcomes and high local control rates. The purpose of this course is to educate attendees on APBI therapy technique. Attendees will learn which patients are candidates for APBI based on age, stage and surgical status. They also will learn different external-beam treatment techniques for APBI. The speaker will discuss the benefits of APBI, including cosmetic outcomes, patient quality of life and local control with minimal late toxicity.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Recognize the patient population indicated for APBI treatment.
    • Discuss limitations of implementing APBI.
    • Explain how surface-guided radiation therapy assists in treatment of APBI patients.
    • List the benefits of APBI compared to traditional whole-breast irradiation.

  • 7:30-8:30 a.m.
    Course 039
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 7:30-8:30 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Jeffrey Levinson, B.S., R.T.(R)(T) and Nicholas Maros, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Harbor I
    This course addresses the challenges involved with positioning pediatric patients who are under anesthesia and the consequential emotional effect of such treatments on the therapy staff. The focus will be improving treatment techniques by using creative simulation practices in addition to unique anatomic manipulation throughout the treatment course to maintain reproducible setups. Attendees will see a variety of imaging examples, such as daily cone-beam CT, that demonstrate the benefit of these methods. Other topics include approaches to reducing patient anxiety and the emotional effect on the therapist as a result of treating pediatric cancer patients.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Introduce tips and tricks to enable optimal positioning.
    • Identify and correct inaccurate setups based on cone-beam imaging.
    • Discuss ways to make patients and their families feel more comfortable with the treatment process.
    • Encourage different methods to help cope with the emotional strain.

  • Course 055
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 7:30-8:30 a.m. (Novice)
    Harbor F

  • 8:50-9:50 a.m.
    Course 040
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 8:50-9:50 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Jill Sutherland, M.H.S., RTT
    Harbor DE
    Person-centered care represents a philosophical shift in the provision of health care; it is care that is organized with patients and begins with an effort to respond to the needs that are most important to the person. Embedding the patient voice through patient-reported outcomes increasingly is recognized as a valuable way to enhance the person-centeredness of cancer systems and improve patient experience.  This lecture describes how to support person-centered care and enhance patient experience through the systematic collection and use of patient-reported outcome data. Attendees then can leverage the pillars of people, process and technology to drive continuous quality improvement initiatives across cancer agencies. The speaker will share trends in symptom burden, commonly reported areas of concern and the accompanying clinical response. Undertaken quality improvement initiatives will be highlighted, including clinical processes and self-management resources.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Define patient-reported outcomes and describe how they can support person-centered care and enhance patient experience.
    • Describe how patient-reported outcome data can drive targeted continuous quality improvement initiatives.
    • Share the results of a patient experience and outcomes project.

  • 8:50-9:50 a.m.
    Course 041
    Caring for Transgender Patients
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 8:50-9:50 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Natosha Houston, R.T.(T) and Kimberly Maura, A.S., R.T.(R)(T)
    Seaport FG
    This course discusses strategies to create an inclusive health care environment and deliver affirmative and competent health care to patients who identify as transgender. Attendees will learn the differences in gender identities, the barriers to health care and the unique health concerns among transgender patients. Attendees also will receive resources from the Human Rights Campaign and the National LGBT Health Education Center at the Fenway Institute to guide radiation oncology departments to provide transgender patients with the highest quality of care.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Distinguish the types of transgender identities.
    • Identify and address the barriers transgender patients face in health care.
    • Recognize the disorders and stressors transgender patients might have.
    • Discuss the risk factors transgender adults face in transition.
    • List the insurance issues that some transgender patients encounter.

  • 8:50-9:50 a.m.
    Course 042
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 8:50-9:50 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by James Hugh III, M.H.A., CHBME, ROCC
    Harbor GH
    Therapist responsibilities have changed over the past few years, requiring today’s therapist to be more actively involved in the electronic health record (EHR). Whether correctly capturing or associating the supervising physician  for a treatment, managing the charges for services rendered or documenting the procedures performed, we are expected to do more and to know more to justify our expense.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Identify areas in the EHR that therapists are responsible for and explain how this responsibility affects the entire department.
    • Discuss the typical procedures recorded by therapists.
    • List the required documentation for various procedures necessary for reimbursement.
    • Recognize how to look at the clinical, regulatory and reimbursement aspects of our field to accomplish more with less.

  • 8:50-9:50 a.m.
    Course 043
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 8:50-9:50 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Brian Liszewski, B.Sc., MRT(T)
    Seaport H
    This course is intended to enhance attendee appreciation of the concept of quality as it relates to radiation therapy from professional, organizational and patient perspectives. The speaker will introduce the components that contribute to a culture of quality and discuss the work completed by the Canadian Partnership for Quality Radiotherapy, with an emphasis on the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration. Using case-based examples, he will examine the application of quality frameworks in the context of the ever-evolving landscape of radiation therapy. He also will describe metrics, benchmarks and the appropriate tools to evaluate a comprehensive quality assurance program. The careful consideration of the multidimensional facets of quality is integral to a robust radiation therapy program, which should be responsive to professional, organizational and patient needs and improve safety and quality of care.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Define the concept of quality from the professional, patient and organizational perspective.
    • Identify components that contribute to a quality culture.
    • Apply quality tools in the radiation therapy setting.
    • Recognize methods for measuring success.
    • Discuss the effect of quality on a radiation therapy program.

  • 8:50-9:50 a.m.
    Course 044
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 8:50-9:50 a.m. (Advanced)
    Advanced
    Presented by Jessica Archambault, A.S., R.T.(T), CMD and Maryse Biron, M.Ed., R.T.(T)
    Harbor I
    This course discusses the mechanisms of a 3-D transperineal ultrasound (TPUS) system and explains how the system can aid in the planning and delivery of volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The speakers will describe the technique for positioning and treatment of prostate cancer at the University of Vermont Medical Center. They will present research results and information collected using TPUS in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Explain the procedure for CT sim/TPUS prostate setups.
    • Describe the image fusion process to enhance treatment planning.
    • Identify how IGRT is used to track intrafraction prostate movement.
    • Discuss benefits of TPUS in treatment delivery.

  • Course 056
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 8:50-9:50 a.m. (Novice)
    Harbor F

  • 10:10-11:10 a.m.
    Course 045
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 10:10-11:10 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Kimberly LaGuardia, M.H.A., R.T.(T)
    Harbor DE
    Communication is the easiest, yet hardest, thing to improve in a department. Today’s health care system and treatment delivery require collaborative communication between patients and caregivers across all disciplines. Improved communication among caregivers has been shown to reflect positively on patients, decrease stress and risk, and increase wellness and overall quality of life. As cancer care grows into treating the whole person and calls upon numerous caregivers across numerous disciplines, communication is more important than ever to ensure quality patient care. This course examines the importance of communication and  touches upon communication styles to help attendees determine the best communication methods for their teams and patients.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Describe the importance of collaborative communication in cancer care.
    • Discuss the benefits of improved communication for caregivers and patients.
    • Explain different types of communication to aide in patient care and workplace efficiency.
    • Recognize methods to improve communication in the workplace.

  • 10:10-11:10 a.m.
    Course 046
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 10:10-11:10 a.m. (INovice)
    Novice
    Presented by Mariamawit Tesfaye, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Seaport FG
    Radiation oncology is a specialty that demands a holistic approach to patient care. It requires a high level of mitigation of potential harms that need to be reported so that we can learn from them. RO-ILS is a standardized electronic method for radiation oncology departments to report incidents. RO-ILS improves incident reporting in our specialty and helps to strengthen a culture of safety.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Define RO-ILS
    • Identify the types of incidents that need to be reported in RO-ILS.
    • Discuss the process of improving procedures based on incident reports.
    • Discuss root cause analysis, the assignment of champions and A3 projects.
    • Idenitfy the benefits of implementing RO-ILS in your department.

  • 10:10-11:10 a.m.
    Course 047
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 10:10-11:10 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Ashley Pruneau, B.S., R.T.(R)(T)
    Harbor GH
    Proton therapy is a distinct form of radiation therapy that shows benefits for many tumor sites. The treatment of breast cancer, specifically left-sided breast, is no exception. Advancements in this technology — pencil-beam scanning in particular — allow for more precision, more controlled dose delivery, higher tumor dose, reduced side effects and increased treatment options. The speaker will highlight basic differences between uniform and pencil-beam treatment techniques, as well as compare photon/electron treatment plans with the proton techniques. She also will discuss unique patient immobilization and setup, as well as the benefits, properties and future of breast cancer treatments.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Describe the basic differences between uniform scanning and pencil-beam scanning.
    • Recognize when pencil-beam scanning is beneficial for breast cancer treatment.
    • Explain the basic setup, immobilization devices and planning process for proton breast cancer treatments.
    • Present clinical case studies regarding photon/electron, uniform scanning and pencil-beam scanning planning techniques.
    • Discuss the potential toxicity and review the skin effects when treating with proton beam therapy.

  • 10:10-11:10 a.m.
    Course 048
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 10:10-11:10 a.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Jae Lee, B.A., R.T.(T)
    Seaport H
    The aim of this presentation is to raise awareness of cultural differences to improve patient experience in the treatment room. However, cultural diversity is not limited to patients. Health care professionals come from countries with different customs. What might be normal to most Americans could be confusing or even offensive to others. For example, a therapist may give a “thumbs up” indicating a patient did something correctly, but in some cultures, that gesture has the equivalent meaning of the middle finger in some cultures.  Cultural sensitivity training could help bridge the gap to create a better working environment for employees and better overall treatment experiences for patients. This presentation provides specific examples of customs that are “normal” to Americans but have different meanings in other cultures. The presenter also will discuss meanings behind other cultures’ customs and how language is a tool to create better relationships with patients. In addition, attendees will have the opportunity to review stereotypes to improve overall cultural sensitivity.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Recognize everyday behavior that might be offensive to people of different backgrounds.
    • Practice behaviors and etiquette of other customs.
    • Minimize stereotypes.
    • Use technology to expand the use of other languages.
    • Use music from around the world to improve each patient experience.

  • 10:10-11:10 a.m.
    Course 049
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 10:10-11:10 a.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Amy Heath, M.S., R.T.(T)
    Harbor I
    Radiation therapists educate patients and their families every day. Whether it is communicating side-effect management advice or discussing how the radiation therapy process works, providing patients with information during their treatment is second nature to many of us. Even though therapists have the most expertise when it comes to radiation therapy patient education, it is rare for radiation therapists to develop educational materials that are distributed to their patients. This course provides attendees the tools they need to produce patient education materials that are relevant to their patients and their facility. The speaker will provide instructions on how to write your message, design your layout, and ensure proper readability and comprehension. Attendees also will learn how to evaluate existing patient education materials for accuracy and reliability. Finally, the instructor will share real-life examples of patient education materials written by radiation therapists.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Define health literacy and its importance in radiation therapy.
    • Identify the need for specific, reliable and focused patient education materials.
    • Recognize required components of patient education material to ensure readability and comprehension.
    • Critique existing educational materials available to patients.
    • Develop a plan for development of print or web-based patient education materials specific to your facility or organization.

  • Course 057
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 10:10-11:10 a.m. (Novice)
    Harbor F

  • 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Course 050
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Gina Passmore, Ed.D., R.T.(T)
    Harbor DE
    Research shows that radiation oncology workers all express various levels of burnout. Understanding how we can reverse burnout in oncology staff — most specifically with radiation therapists — could help increase job satisfaction, patient satisfaction and organizational effectiveness. The problem this study addresses is that the literature does not specify which of the six influences have the greatest impact specifically for radiation therapists. Therefore, leaders in radiation departments do not have the information they need to design improvement for their workers.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Discuss recent studies that highlight the dangers of burnout in health care workers, including radiation therapists.
    • Evaluate the effect burnout has on medical errors.
    • Examine how burnout impacts job satisfaction and organizational issues.

  • 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Course 051
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Intermediate)
    Intermediate
    Presented by Samantha Crowell, B.S. and Elizabeth Krcik, B.S., R.T.(T)
    Seaport FG
    Learn about a one-of-a-kind vertical computed tomography scanner and how it is used in the simulation of lung cancer patients using a thoracic chair. With this advanced technology, patients are able to sit upright, instead of in the traditional supine position for proton therapy. The unique vertical treatment method achieves elongation of the lungs and decreases respiration motion of the tumor, allowing more precise and accurate treatment by shrinking the planned target volume margin. The course provides an overview of the vertical CT and thoracic chair treatments through clinical case studies. Attendees also will gain firsthand knowledge of practical skills and tools used to employ a new setup in the clinic.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Review the entire process for thoracic chair patients from simulation using the vertical CT to treatment.
    • Identify the benefits of supine vs. sitting upright for lung cancers.
    • Analyze improvements to the vertical setup since implementation.
    • Recognize the best candidates for use of the thoracic chair.
    • Discuss future opportunities and plans for the thoracic chair and vertical CT.

  • 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Course 052
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Adam Brown, B.S., R.T.(T), CMD
    Harbor GH
    This course is designed to provide a glimpse into the roles for therapists and dosimetrists in the realm of documentation, reimbursement and compliance. The speaker will detail the importance of these job roles, as well as a review of current Medicare guidelines to assist in compliance documentation and code capture for procedures performed within the radiation oncology department. He also will provide attendees with references and resources to assist in their new role and day-to-day responsibilities.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the roles, responsibilities and expectations of therapists.
    • Provide instruction on the radiation oncology process of care.
    • Discuss educational and clinical tools that could be beneficial in navigating through today’s ever-changing reimbursement world.

  • 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Course 053
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Stacy Anderson, M.S., R.T.(T), CMD and Marissa Mangrum, M.S.R.S., R.T.(T)
    Seaport H
    Since the early 1980s, technological advances in radiation therapy equipment have mirrored the phenomenal capabilities of today’s computer systems and imaging modalities. The complexity of treatments continues to evolve, but the goal of giving as much dose to the affected region while sparing the healthy tissue remains a constant. As “cutting edge” became synonymous with better treatment, the usage of superficial and orthovoltage treatment equipment continued to diminish in parallel to the mainstream use of electron capabilities of the linear accelerators. With the continued increase of nonmelanoma skin cancers in the United States and worldwide, superficial radiation is experiencing a resurgence in usage. This is particularly the case for a subset of the patient population that is ill suited to surgical approaches. So the question remains: What role does radiation therapy play in this resurgence? This course looks at the historical usage of this treatment modality and explores treatment trends and the rationales for patient outcomes.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Explain the historical trends in radiation therapy as related to superficial treatments.
    • Identify the technological advancements seen in today's superficial equipment.
    • Appreciate the dichotomy of treatment delivery between dermatologists and radiation oncologists.
    • Learn the types of conditions that lend to treatment with superficial radiation therapy.
    • Discuss future directions.

  • 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Course 054
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Novice)
    Novice
    Presented by Kelsey Alford, A.S., A.A.S., R.T.(R)(T)
    Harbor I
    The purpose of this course is to improve clinical knowledge of how the patient is affected when the treatment area is improperly contoured. Attendees will learn the importance of, and proper methods to, avoid air gap when applying bolus, and will hear the data of resulting dose changes and method of arrival. The speaker is open to discussion with the audience to gather insight from additional radiation oncology sites.

    After participating in the session, you will be able to:

    • Identify various bolus application methods.
    • Discuss dose effects to patients with considerable bolus air gap.
    • Explain the relevance of careful contouring to the patient’s skin with various bolus application options to eliminate air gap.
    • Deliver various bolus application methods.
    • Share ideas that are successful at your facility.

  • 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Course 058
    Tuesday, Sept. 26, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (Novice)
    Harbor F


Exhibit Hours
Sunday, Sept. 24: 7 a.m.-4 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 25: 7 a.m.-4 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 26: 7 a.m.-11:30 a.m.