CARE Bill History

July 2012As of July 13, 2013, there were 130 bipartisan cosponsors of the CARE bill (H.R. 2104)

June 2012 – Congressional Hearing held on June 8th titled “Examining the Appropriateness of Standards for Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy Technologists,” the hearing was called by the House Energy and Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Health to discuss the scope of the CARE bill. June 26th- The CARE bill was introduced into the U.S. Senate as S. 3338 by Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., and Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa.

May 2012The ASRT hosted a Capitol Hill briefing on May 17 to educate lawmakers and their staffs about the role of the diagnostic imaging team and the CARE bill. The briefing featured speakers from the ASRT, American College of Radiology, Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance and the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM).

December 2011 – At the end of the first session of the 112th Congress there are 67 bipartisan cosponsors of the CARE bill (HR 2104).

November 2011 – The Alliance meets during the RSNA meeting in Chicago. At the request of SDMS’ lobbyists additional changes are made to the CARE bill based on House Energy & Commerce majority staff suggestions.

October 2011 – ASRT testifies at a FDA meeting on MR safety.  Ellen Lipman, M.S., R.T.(R)(MR) represents the society.

June 2011 – H.R. 2104 is introduced by Rep. Ed Whitfield (R-KY-1) and Rep. John Barrow (D-GA-12).  The CARE bill is referred to the House Energy & Commerce Health Subcommittee and House Ways & Means Committee.  The Outstanding Grass-roots Advocacy Award is presented to Bernadette Garofola, M.Ed., R.T.(R)(T)(CT), and the Virginia Society of Radiologic Technologists during the Annual Governance and House of Delegates meeting.

March 2011 – ASRT holds the 13th R.T. in D.C. meeting. First time events include a radiologist-extender track to support legislation for RA reimbursement in Medicare and an educational session sponsored by the Medical Imaging and Technology Alliance (MITA) on dose reduction in computed tomography. The ASRT Award for Excellence in Radiologic Science Advocacy is presented to Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN-7) and Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT).

January 2011 – The 112th Congress convenes.  The Alliance takes the opportunity to make some small changes to the CARE bill before it is reintroduced. The House is now under Republican leadership with the Senate still under Democratic control. ASRT consolidates House and Senate lobbying activites with Webster, Chamberlain & Bean.

December 2010 - The 111th Congress adjourns without taking action on the CARE bill. H.R. 3652 has 135 cosponsors and S. 3737 has nine cosponsors.

November 2010 - The Alliance meets in Chicago during the RSNA meeting. During the November midterm elections, Republicans regain the majority in the House of Representatives after making repeal of the Affordable Health Care for America Act their campaign focus.

August 2010 - Senators Mike Enzi (R-WY) and Tom Harkin (D-IA) introduce S. 3737. Senator Enzi is the ranking member of the Senate HELP Committee and Senator Harkin is the committee chairman.

June 2010 - ASRT presents Lorenza Clausen, R.T.(R)(CT)(MR), and the California Society of Radiologic Technologists with the Outstanding Grass-roots Advocacy Awards during the Annual Governance and House of Delegates Meeting in Albuquerque, N.M. Representatives from ASRT testify during an FDA meeting on radiation therapy errors.

April 2010 - H.R. 3652 has 47 bipartisan cosponsors. ASRT testifies during an FDA meeting on excessive radiation dose to patients undergoing CT, fluoroscopy and nuclear medicine examinations.

March 2010 - ASRT hosts the 12th R.T. in D.C. meeting with more than 120 attendees. The ASRT Award for Excellence in Radiologic Science Advocacy is presented to Rep. John Barrow (D-GA-12) and Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI). ASRT meets with the Senate Finance Committee to discuss jurisdictional issues over the enforcement provision in the Senate bill. After nurses performing peripherally inserted central catheter line insertions using ultrasound and members of the ophthalmologic community express concerns, the use of ultrasound for visualization for vascular access and ophthalmologic purposes are exempted from the Senate version of the CARE bill.

February 2010 - Based on reports in The New York Times of patient deaths resulting from radiation therapy errors and increasing concerns about radiation dose used in medical imaging examinations, the House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee convenes a hearing titled Medical Radiation: An Overview of the Issues. ASRT Vice-speaker of the House Sandra Hayden, B.S., R.T.(T), testifies on the need for education and certification of technical personnel involved in radiation therapy procedures. At the hearing, Rep. Barrow calls for action on H.R. 3652 and Chairman Frank Pallone comments, "Why don't we just pass the CARE bill?"

December 2009 - At the end of the first session of the 111th Congress, H.R. 3652 has 12 bipartisan cosponsors in addition to Rep. Barrow.

November 2009 - The Alliance meets in Albuquerque, N.M., to focus on introduction of the Senate version of the CARE bill.

September 2009 - The CARE bill (now H.R. 3652) is introduced in the House of Representatives by Rep. John Barrow (D-GA).

December 2008 - The 110th Congress adjourns without taking further action on the CARE bill.

November 2008 - The Alliance meets in Albuquerque, N.M., to discuss the CARE bill and MIPPA accreditation standards. After the national election, the Democratic Party holds the majority in the House and Senate.

July 2008 - Congress enacts the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA), requiring facilities that bill Medicare for CT, MR, nuclear medicine or PET examinations to be accredited. In addition, accreditation programs must include standards for personnel who perform the technical services involved in these examinations.

June 2008 - Sens. Max Baucus (D-MT) and Chuck Grassley (R-IA) each introduce bills that include provisions related to the accreditation of medical imaging facilities that provide PET, CT, MR and nuclear medicine examinations. The ASRT presents Kim Robert, M.B.A., R.T.(R), and the Wisconsin Society of Radiologic Technologists with the Outstanding Grass-roots Advocacy Awards during the Annual Governance and House of Delegates Meeting in Albuquerque, N.M. H.R. 583 has 148 cosponsors, and S. 1042 has 27 cosponsors.

May 2008 - House Resolution 1216 is introduced by Rep. Sue Myrick (R-NC). This resolution encourages radiologists, radiologic technologists, medical physicists, pediatricians, other pediatric health care providers and parents to consider the different needs of children when it comes to radiation dosing. It also encourages the appropriate use of computed tomography scans in children, as well asradiation protection efforts in pediatric imaging so that children may be properly diagnosed and efficiently treated for injury and disease.

March 2008 - The ASRT hosts the 10th Annual R.T. in D.C. Meeting with more than 120 attendees. The ASRT Award for Excellence in Radiologic Science Advocacy is presented to Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ). The Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions (HELP) Committee, chaired by Sen. Kennedy, passes S. 1042, removing Section H from the bill at the demand of the Senate Finance Committee based on a jurisdictional issue with the understanding that enforcement will be restored in the Senate Finance Committee or on the Senate floor. At the end of April there are 145 cosponsors on H.R. 583 and 27 cosponsors on S. 1042.

February 2008 - The Alliance meets in Ponte Vedra, Fla., with 25 organizations represented. The Alliance decides to suspend work on the draft regulations and refocuses its attention on enactment of the CARE bill. The Medical Dosimetrist Certification Board and American Society of Echocardiography petition to join the Alliance.

October 2007 - The Alliance meets in Las Vegas, Nev., and welcomes the American Society of Echocardiography and the Medical Dosimetrist Certification Board as observers. H.R. 583 has 124 cosponsors, and S. 1042 has 22 cosponsors. Representatives from the ASRT and the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography meet with Health Subcommittee Chair Pallone to discuss the CARE bill's progress.

August 2007
- The House of Representatives passes the Children's Health and Medicare Protection (CHAMP) Act, which contains provisions regarding the accreditation of facilities that provide PET, CT, MR and nuclear medicine examinations. This legislation was vetoed by President George W. Bush in October 2007.

June 2007 - The Society for Vascular Ultrasound joins the Alliance. H.R. 583 has 117 cosponsors, and S. 1042 has 22 cosponsors by the end of the month. ASRT hosts its annual Grass-roots Network Breakfast in Albuquerque, N.M. David LeClair, B.S., R.T.(R); Tom Davis, R.T.(R)(CT); and the North Carolina Society of Radiologic Technologists are presented with the Outstanding Grass-roots Advocacy Awards.

March 2007
- The ASRT hosts the 9th Annual R.T. in D.C. Meeting with more than 150 attendees. The ASRT Award for Excellence in Radiologic Science Advocacy is presented to Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) and Rep. Nathan Deal (R-GA-9). On March 29, Sens. Mike Enzi (R-WY) and Ted Kennedy (D-MA) introduce the CARE bill as S. 1042, which then is referred to the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions (HELP) Committee chaired by Sen. Kennedy. Sen. Enzi is the ranking minority member of the HELP Committee.

February 2007 - The Alliance meets in Tysons Corner, Va., to continue discussion and work on draft regulations. The Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography joins the Alliance.

January 2007 - The 110th Congress convenes. H.R. 583 — now known as the Consistency, Accuracy, Responsibility and Excellence (CARE) in Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy bill — is introduced in the House on Jan. 19 by Rep. Mike Doyle (D-PA-14). It is referred to the House Energy & Commerce Committee chaired by Rep. John Dingell (D-MI-15), Health Subcommittee chaired by Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ-6). This bill exactly matches the Senate RadCARE bill that was passed by the Senate in December 2006.

December 2006 - The Senate passes S. 2322 with unanimous consent on Dec. 6. S. 2322 is referred to the House Energy & Commerce Committee. Despite a major grass-roots campaign urging the House to pass S. 2322 in its remaining 50 hours, Congress adjourns on Dec. 8 without taking action on the bill.

November 2006
- Democrats win the leadership in the House and Senate for the 110th Congress. All of the cosponsors on S. 2322 and 91% of those on H.R. 1426 retain their seats for the next term. After the elections, H.R. 1426 has 135 cosponsors and S. 2322 has 19 cosponsors.

September 2006 - The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee unanimously reports S. 2322 favorably without amendment on Sept. 20. The Congressional Budget Office is asked to estimate cost savings and projected expenditures associated with the enactment of S. 2322. By the end of the month, S. 2322 has 18 cosponsors.

August 2006 - The Alliance meets in San Francisco, Calif., to continue work on draft regulations. At this meeting, the Alliance determines that the approach to education and credentialing standards used in S. 2322 is preferable to the approach taken in H.R. 1426. The Alliance decides to use the Senate approach in both chambers if the CARE bill needs to be reintroduced in the 110th Congress. The Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography and the American Healthcare Radiology Administrators attend the Alliance meeting as observer organizations.

July 2006 - ASRT CEO Lynn May delivers testimony supporting the need for the House Committee on Energy and Commerce to take action on H.R. 1426 at a hearing titled "Use of Imaging Services: Providing Appropriate Care for Medicare Beneficiaries" held by the Subcommittee on Health on July 18. Also testifying on the use of medical imaging are representatives from the American College of Radiology, American College of Cardiology, MedPAC, American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and medical imaging equipment manufacturers. At the end of July, H.R. 1426 has 130 cosponsors and S. 2322 has 17 cosponsors.

June 2006 - The ASRT hosts its annual Grass-roots Network Breakfast in Denver. Gary Duehring, Ph.D., R.T.(R)(MR), CRA, and the South Dakota Society of Radiologic Technologists are presented with the Outstanding Grass-roots Advocacy Awards. H.R. 1426 has 128 cosponsors by the end of the month.

May 2006 - The Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography joins the Alliance.

March 2006 - The ASRT, in conjunction with the Society of Nuclear Medicine - Technologist Section, hosts the eighth R.T. in D.C. meeting and honors Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) and Rep. Bart Gordon (R-TN) with the ASRT Award for Excellence in Radiologic Science Advocacy. By the end of the month, S. 2322 has nine cosponsors and H.R. 1426 has 112 cosponsors. ASRT lobbyists work with House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Joe Barton to move the CARE bill before the committee.

February 2006 - Sens. Mike Enzi (R-WY) and Ted Kennedy (D-MA) introduce the RadCARE bill (S. 2322) on Feb. 17. The Alliance meets in Washington, D.C., and continues its work on the draft regulations to be submitted after the CARE/RadCARE bill is enacted. Radiologist assistant standards are added to the regulations document, and the Alliance determines that education and credentialing standards for bone density equipment operators should be included in the draft regulations. The Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography and the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors attend the Alliance meeting.

December 2005 - The first session of the 109th Congress ends on Dec. 21. There are 97 cosponsors on H.R. 1426.

August 2005 - Hurricane Katrina hits the Gulf Coast, decimating homes in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Congress' attention is turned to disaster relief.

July 2005 - ASRT staff and the ASRT Board of Directors meet with the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography to discuss the inclusion of sonography in the RadCARE bill, opening dialogue between these two organizations.

June 2005 - The ASRT hosts its annual Grass-roots Network Breakfast in Orlando, Fla. Cathie Kukec, B.M.E., R.T.(R)(QM), and the Illinois State Society of Radiologic Technologists are presented with the Outstanding Grass-roots Advocacy Awards. H.R. 1426 has 72 cosponsors by the end of the month. The Senate RadCARE bill is redrafted by Sen. Enzi's staff without an exemption for sonography due to the senator's view that all medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures should have quality assurance guaranteed by educated and credentialed personnel.

May 2005 - The ASRT, Society of Nuclear Medicine - Technologist Section, American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board and American College of Radiology host a 4-hour symposium on technologist issues at the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors meeting in Kansas City, Mo. The CRCPD joins the Alliance as a consulting member.

April 2005 - The ASRT, in conjunction with the Society of Nuclear Medicine - Technologist Section, hosts its 7th Annual R.T. in D.C. Meeting and honors Sen. Thad Cochran (R-MS) and Rep. Chip Pickering (R-MS) with the ASRT Award for Excellence in Radiologic Science Advocacy. By the end of the month, H.R. 1426 has 54 cosponsors. ASRT lobbyists continue to work with Sen. Enzi on the reintroduction of the RadCARE bill in the Senate.

March 2005 - The Alliance meets in Washington, D.C., and continues its work on the draft regulations to be submitted to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services after the CARE bill is enacted. The Alliance also meets with members in the House and Senate and decides that education and credentialing standards for radiologist assistants should be included in the draft regulations. Rep. Chip Pickering (R-MS) introduces H.R. 1426 on March 17. On the same date, the House Ways and Means Committee holds a hearing regarding Medicare and the appropriate utilization of medical imaging procedures. During the hearing, education and credentialing standards for non-physician clinical staff (e.g., radiologic technologists) are mentioned as a measure that will cut Medicare costs. This recommendation is also contained in a report to Congress from the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), an independent federal commission advising Congress regarding Medicare costs.

January 2005
- The 109th Congress convenes. Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY) is named chairman of the Senate HELP Committee.

November 2004 - Following elections, 93% of the CARE bill cosponsors retain their seat in Congress. Congress adjourns sine die in December 2004. H.R. 1214 has 112 cosponsors, and S. 1197 has 18 cosponsors.

September 2004 - Realizing that that work of the 108th Congress is coming to an end, ASRT lobbyists meet with the House Energy and Commerce Committee staff to have the CARE bill included in the committee's health omnibus bill. The committee, now chaired by Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX), focuses its attention on appropriations bills and does not take up health issues before the November election.

June 2004 - The ASRT hosts its annual Grass-roots Network Breakfast in Dallas, featuring a keynote address by Rep. Martin Frost (D-TX). Sharon Wartenbee, R.T.(R)(BD), and the Tennessee Society of Radiologic Technologists are presented with the Outstanding Grass-roots Advocacy Awards. H.R. 1214 has 109 cosponsors, and S. 1197 has 17 cosponsors.

March 2004 - ASRT hosts the R.T. in D.C. meeting and honors Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY) and Rep. Mike Doyle (D-PA) with the ASRT Award for Excellence in Radiologic Science Advocacy. By the end of the month, H.R. 1214 has 95 cosponsors and S. 1197 has 12 cosponsors.

September 2003 - H.R. 1214 has 57 cosponsors. Sen. Jim Jeffords (I-VT) signs on as the sixth cosponsor on S. 1197. Rep. Heather Wilson sends a letter to House Energy & Commerce Committee Chairman Bill Tauzin (R-LA) and asks for committee action on H.R. 1214. January 2004 - Congress reconvenes for the second session of the 108th Congress. HR 1214 has 67 cosponsors and S 1107 has 7 cosponsors. The Alliance meets in Washington, DC, and spends considerable time on Capitol Hill seeking cosponsors for the CARE and RadCARE bills.

June 2003 - The RadCARE bill is introduced in the Senate on June 5 by Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY). Sens. Kennedy (D-MA), Dorgan (D-ND), Lautenberg (D-NJ) and Daschle (D-SD) are cosponsors. H.R. 1214 has 26 bipartisan cosponsors. The ASRT hosts its annual Grass-roots Network Breakfast in Las Vegas, Nev., and honors Diane Mayo, R.T.(R)(CT), and the Missouri Society of Radiologic Technologists with Outstanding Grass-roots Advocacy Awards.

March 2003 - The House version of the CARE bill is reintroduced by Rep. Heather Wilson as H.R. 1214 on March 11. Military action against Iraq begins on March 19. The ASRT hosts the 5th Annual R.T. in D.C. Meeting and honors Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA) and Rep. John J. "Jimmy" Duncan (R-TN) with the ASRT Award for Excellence in Radiologic Science Advocacy. Seven days after the meeting, H.R. 1214 has 13 cosponsors.

February 2003 - The Alliance meets in Washington, D.C., to continue drafting CARE regulations and to lobby Congress in support of the CARE Bill.

January 2003 - ASRT representatives meet with Rep. Heather Wilson and ask her to reintroduce the CARE Bill. ASRT lobbyists also meet with Senator Kennedy and begin looking for a republican cosponsor for the Senate version of the CARE bill.

November 2002 - The 107th Congress adjourns without any action on H.R. 1011. Congress also fails to reauthorize the Mammography Quality Standards Act before adjourning.

July 2002 - There are 54 bipartisan cosponsors to H.R. 1011. The ASRT pushes for the bill to be taken up in the House Energy and Commerce Committee and for Sen. Ted Kennedy to introduce the CARE Bill into the Senate.

June 2002 - ASRT has its third Grass-roots Network Breakfast in Birmingham, Ala., and introduces its members to new "e-advocacy" efforts.

March 2002 - The ASRT hosts its annual R.T. in D.C. meeting. The first Awards for Excellence in Radiologic Science Advocacy are presented to Rep. Heather Wilson and Sen. Ted Kennedy. Current efforts continues to focus on garnering more cosponsors for H.R. 1011 and getting the CARE bill introduced into the Senate.

January 2002 - The Alliance for Quality Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy meets in Washington, D.C., to lobby the CARE Bill and to prepare a consensus draft of regulations that will be presented to the Secretary of Health and Human Services after the CARE Bill is enacted.

December 2001 - There are now 35 cosponsors on H.R. 1011. ASRT starts working with Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-MA) on a version of the CARE Bill for the U.S. Senate.

September 2001 - Terrorists attack the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Congress receives letters tainted with anthrax that halts work. Congress' attention is turned toward homeland security and bioterrorism issues and to military action in Afghanistan.

August 2001 - The Alliance for Quality Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy meets in Albuquerque, N.M. The Alliance is now made up of 17 professional, educational and credentialing organizations that represent personnel who perform, plan and evaluate medical imaging and radiation therapy.

June 2001 - The ASRT Grass-roots Network Breakfast is held in Orlando, Fla.

April 2001 - The ASRT hosts its third R.T. in D.C. meeting. More than 100 medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals participate, and 19 cosponsors sign on to H.R. 1011.

March 2001 - The Alliance meets in Washington, D.C., and visits with legislators on Capitol Hill. The Alliance approves and publishes a position statement on medical errors. The CARE bill is introduced in the House of Representatives as H.R. 1011 by Rep. Heather Wilson (R-NM) and referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

December 2000
- The 106th Congress adjourns and H.R. 5274 dies without any action.

November 2000 - Rep. Rick Lazio loses his bid for a Senate seat against First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. However, the CARE bill's cosponsors are re-elected to Congress for the 107th session.

October 2000 - The Alliance meets in Chicago to discuss legislative strategy for the 107th Congress. It is decided that the Alliance will broaden its legislative scope and issue a position statement on medical errors.

September 2000 - The CARE bill is introduced in the House (H.R. 5274). With time running out in the 106th Congress, no action on the bill is expected.

June 2000 - The first ASRT Grass-roots Network Breakfast takes place at the ASRT Annual Conference in Albuquerque, N.M.

April 2000 - ASRT hosts its second R.T. in D.C. meeting. More than 80 medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals participate. Rep. Lazio confirms his commitment to sponsor the CARE bill in the House, and 16 cosponsors are secured. The Alliance meets in Washington, D.C., and the American College of Radiology expresses its support for the CARE bill.

March 2000 - Rep. Lazio's office asks that the federal minimum standards bill title be changed to the Consumer Assurance of Radiologic Excellence (CARE) bill. At the request of the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography and the Society of Vascular Technology, references to medical ultrasound examinations are removed from the CARE bill. ASRT provides public testimony supporting AHRQ's study on credentialing of sonographers and medical imaging personnel and its effects on the quality of services. Because legislative appropriation was not made to fund this study, the AHRQ did not take further action.

January 2000 - The Institute of Medicine releases "To Err is Human," a report detailing medical errors occurring in health care settings. ASRT and the Alliance use this information to argue the need for federal minimum standards. Cardiovascular technology groups and medical physicist organizations approach ASRT about possible inclusion in the federal minimum standards bill and membership in the Alliance. Collaborative efforts continue with other medical associations interested in participating in Alliance activities. The ASRT Political Action Committee (ASRT-PAC) is organized and incorporated.

November 1999 - The Alliance meets during RSNA in Chicago to discuss the federal minimum standards initiative and regulations. Work continues to refine the legislative proposal and regulations. Rep. Lazio continues to be lobbied to serve as the bill's sponsor. In the waning days of the first session of the 106th Congress, a law is passed that charges the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to study the effect of credentialing on the quality of sonography and medical imaging services.

June 1999 - The Alliance holds its second meeting in Chicago and starts working on revisions to the regulations (42 CFR Part 75) that will need to be amended upon adoption of the federal minimum standards bill. Rep. Rick Lazio (R-NY) expresses interest in sponsoring the bill in Congress, and the ASRT continues to work with his office to refine the legislative proposal and garner supportive cosponsors in the House of Representatives. ASRT also works to find a bill sponsor in the Senate.

April 1999 - ASRT holds its first R.T. in D.C. meeting in Washington, D.C. More than 100 medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals attend to educate their congressmen and lobby for the Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Act in the new 106th Congress.

December 1998 - The Alliance for Quality Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy holds its first meeting during RSNA in Chicago. The Alliance, presently made up of 17 radiologic associations, starts drafting a bill to amend the 1981 Consumer-Patient Radiation Health and Safety Act. ASRT develops a grass-roots network of politically active members to assist with legislative activities.

June 1998 - A legislative strategy is determined. ASRT will advocate federal legislation to amend the existing voluntary Consumer-Patient Radiation Health and Safety Act to make it mandatory for states to put education and credentialing standards into place for radiologic technologists. ASRT starts working with the Society of Nuclear Medicine, which is also interested in putting standards into place for nuclear medicine technologists, along with soliciting support from other radiology and health care associations. An attempt is made to attach an amendment to the Mammography Quality Standards Act reauthorization bill that would place an enforcement provision in the 1981 act; however, opposition to any amendments that may slow the bill's progress prevailed.

February 1998 - ASRT creates a Government Relations Department and hires a director and government liaison.

June 1997 - ASRT Board of Directors votes to set aside $1 million to establish federally mandated minimum education and credentialing standards for radiologic technologists.